Stunning Skyscraper by Studio Gang Unveiled for Kingshighway Site

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While the fact that planning for a residential tower has been in progress at the West Pine-Kingshighway site has been known to nextSTL readers since May, nothing quite compares to a rendering. This is especially true with a high-profile location and higher-profile architect in Studio Gang.

The first rendering available reveals the most forward design tower presented in St. Louis in decades. The first image available shows a stunning 36-story, 385-foot residential tower. The building, at 100 N. Kingshighway, will be known as One Hundred.The $130M tower will have 305 apartments, 355 parking spaces, and a small retail space of less than 1K sf on the ground level.

The $130M tower will have 305 apartments, 355 parking spaces, and a small retail space of less than 1K sf on the ground level. Planned are approximately 120 1BD, 120 2BD, 30 3BD, and 30 studio units.

The project appears set to be granted 10 years of 95% and an additional 5 years of 50% tax abatement. The value of the abatement is roughly 8% of project costs.  Project details will be presented at a public meeting next week.

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Images presented at the 12/12/16 public meeting – all images by Studio Gang (click to enlarge):













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From our previous reporting:

Antheus on Kingshighway_logo{One Hundred is planned for the lot highlighted in blue at left}

nextSTL has learned of planning underway to build a high-rise residential building at West Pine and Kingshighway. The 0.72-acre surface parking lot, owned by the Silliman Group and Antheus Capital was acquired along with the purchase of the 16-story Parc Frontenac across West Pine and is currently used for resident parking.

West Pine at Kingshighway

Sources tell nextSTL that ambitions for the residential tower reach 40 stories, but may be scaled back due to construction cost estimates. Sources further shared that the owner has engaged Studio Gang architects out of Chicago for design work.

Studio Gang is known for high design, with recent residential projects featuring an undulating exteriors that maximize air and light exposure and offer a landmark facades. In Chicago, the firm’s recent projects include City Hyde Park and Aqua Tower.

Reached for comment, Peter Cassel, Director of Community Development with the Silliman Group and Mac Properties told nextSTL that they do not comment on buildings under contract, nor potential developments, but did note that the firm has experience developing surface parking lots.

According to a company profile, Antheus Capital and its two subsidiaries, Silliman and Mac, have acquired and redeveloped more than 130 buildings and 6,000 total living units of multi-family and mixed use properties in Chicago, Kansas City, and St. Louis. The company redevelops to hold and manages its own properties.

In St. Louis, the group owns the Parc Frontenac at 40 N. Kingshighway, the nearby 15-story Montclair on the Park at 18 S. Kingshighway, The Dorchester at 665 S. Skinker at the other end of Forest Park, and Vandy House at Lindell Boulevard and Vandeventer Avenue.

Cassel told nextSTL that under new ownership, the St. Louis properties have seen significant investment. “There’s a lot of new product coming to St. Louis,” Cassel noted. “A couple years ago, it was possible to have an OK apartment in a great location, but now you have to have a great apartment and a great location.”

Montclair on the Park has seen more than $4.5M in permits issued for remaking living units, interior shared spaces and amenities. Cassel stated the Montclair had significant vacancy when acquired, which has allowed renovations to proceed floor by floor without emptying occupied units. Parc Frontenac has seen about $850K in permit activity for first floor renovations.

Montclair on the Park{Montclair on the Park (1951)}

Parc Frontenac{Parc Frontenac (1956)}

Addressing the significant investment being made in the two buildings facing Forest Park across Kingshighway, Cassel stated, “They’re fantastic locations, the opportunity to live in the Central West End and right on Forest Park suggests it should be a great apartment.”

Silliman Group and Antheus Capital have been active on the other side of Missouri in Kansas City, especially along Armour Boulevard. According to a 2014 Kansas City Business Journal item, the group invested $150M in multi-family residential development along that corridor from 2007-2014. The total investment in Kansas City as of 2014 had reached two dozen buildings and more than 1,500 apartments.

If construction proceeds with a Studio Gang design, it will mark another notable investment in big-name architecture in St. Louis. At Kingshighway and Lindell, immediately north of the West Pine site, Kohn Pederson Fox (KPF) will work with Forum Studio to envision a significant infill project (no new news there). At Washington University in St. Louis, KieranTimberlake was chosen to design a new building for the Sam Fox School. Plans viewed by nextSTL show what will be a thoroughly contemporary building.

Studio Gang’s Aqua Tower and City Hyde Park:

Aqua Tower Chicago_Studio GangCity Hyde Park_Studio GangCity Hyde Park_Studio Gang 2

Studio Gang has won numerous awards, including being named the 2016 Firm of the Year at the Architizer A+ Awards. Founding principal Jeanne Gang was recognized as Architect of the Year by Architectural Review at its 2016 Women in Architecture awards. Jeanne Gang has also engaged in the conversation about the impact of design in “Post-Ferguson America”. You can click here to view her concept for “Polis Station,” which explores how “elements of a police station are broken apart and integrated into their community”.

After the completion of a couple projects in St. Louis City’s booming central corridor that can only be characterized as architectural malpractice, recent projects have offered better design. New construction at 4101 Laclede and the Koman Group project at West Pine at Euclid are more contemporary. Both were designed by Trivers Associates of St. Louis. Nearby institutional construction at the St. Louis College of Pharmacy has presented an investment in design as well.

With several proposals rumored for high-rise construction in the Central West End, we recently chronicled the tall residential buildings of the neighborhood. Half a dozen buildings of more than 10 stories were built in the 1950s and 60s. Yet since 1983, a span of 33 years, just two were added as the Park East Tower (2005) and 4545 Lindell (2007) were completed.

Central West End residential high-rise timeline

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  • Nick Johnson

    Is there any news on the timeline of the CWE Studio Gang building?

  • Imran

    Could not make the meeting. Any explanation why they need a curb cut interrupting West Pine?
    I doubt the form-based code supports that.
    And why does a garage of modest footprint need three entrance and exit lanes?

    • tbatts666

      You’re right. We should protect our curbs and versatile street parking. The three entrances is probably excessive.

    • Alex Ihnen

      It appears that West Pine is the garage entrance for residents. The alley entrance perhaps for visitors, deliveries and maybe the small retail space?

  • Reality

    Does any new development in STL actually pay taxes? Urban life and desired public amenities do cost money after all.

    • rgbose

      The Standard at Vandeventer and FPA didn’t get incentives. They’ll pay $750k in property taxes this year.

      • Alex Ihnen

        Which is a good example of the argument to incentivize good design.

        • STLrainbow

          this goes to the need for a professional/competent design-review board…. much more frustrating to me than projects like Standard that don’t request subsidies are those that do get them but are still not good design. (imo, there isn’t much difference in quality b/w the Standard and the newest one on the Cafe Ventana block on W. Pine, e.g.)

          • brickhugger

            The standard is crap; I would’ve been happy to see a little incentive their way if it meant a better project. Hell, even if it meant they built what they originally proposed. (and don’t bother complaining to them; I tried; they were snotty and insulting and basically said ‘deal with it.’)

          • STLrainbow

            Sure, I’m not against reasonable incentives to improve a project, but again it’s frustrating to me that we too often get inferior product even when handing them out. (Like that latest West Pine product.) Just leads me to think that requiring bigger projects like these to go before a professional design review board as part of the approval process would be helpful.

      • STLrainbow

        Brandonview comes to mind as someone who has doing a fair amount of incentive free work downtown with his “Gallery” projects.

      • STLrainbow

        $750K compared to $50K prior to redevelopment.

      • Reality

        Great, and if ALL new development paid its fair share, there wouldn’t be a need to levy a regressive sales tax (which will be bonded – a terrible deal) to pay for Metrolink.

  • STLrainbow

    Is an Architectural/Design Review Board something STL should have now that we’re seeing a steady stream of substantive new construction proposals?

    • Alex Ihnen

      Yes. Also, we currently have 28 of them. 🙂

  • brickhugger

    (PS: some of their designs aren’t quite so original. Take City Hyde Park for example; before you talk about it’s originality, you might take a look at this):

    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/15c85413733fe31144d2171fd921a3ba5e13e876380220f7ca180a17f3a704cc.jpg

    • Chicagoan

      There are a ton of buildings with this general aesthetic, even in Chicago alone.

  • brickhugger

    I was hoping for something a little closer to this: https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/686933d0404e2278a282ff58c9900f16d972120df9e0f8032991d5d6007264ef.jpg Maybe with the overhangs on the side wings in some combination with the original design, and lotus petals in metal around the dome on top.

    • Chicagoan

      So, you’d like a new building that looks older?

      In that instance, Lucien Lagrange is the Chicago architect for you.

      http://www.lucienlagrange.com/home

      Robert A. M. Stern would also do the trick.

      • brickhugger

        ive seen several of lagrange’s projects; if he could do what I have in mind, I’m ok with that.

        • Rod

          Really? Lucien LaGrange is the king of formed concrete painted beige and big out of place ornaments to make you forget the ugly beige concrete.

          • brickhugger

            they’re not stellar, but I can live with them.

      • brickhugger

        (OT: he should design a space hotel, which would be called ‘LaGrange Point’) 🙂

  • Larry Guinn

    Question: Is this project in place of, or in addition to, the Koplar / Koman Group project for Kingshighway and Lindell Boulevard? Or is that project dead?

    • Alex Ihnen

      That and this are two distinct, unrelated projects. The one at Lindell is still in the works.

      • Larry Guinn

        Thanks!

  • Tom of the Missouri

    Like the look, but with that upside down shake roof look for a curtain wall and as a multiple multi-family building owner myself I would be quite worried over the long term with water leaks on those decks. Looks to me like they would catch a lot of rain water. Maybe that is the point. Perhaps they plan to pipe it to a huge retention pond on the property to be environmentally correct. 😉

  • Dan

    Yes-finally something contemporary. I find it quite human-scaled.

    • tbatts666

      What about this project makes it human scaled?

  • Rod

    Actually it meets the street at a rather human scale. It’s not cold and foreboding. It calls attention to itself absolutely, but I’d say the attention is warranted. Why not have a sculptural form? Yes, we could go with tried and true – which today means formed concrete painted beige, or tight green and blue glass exteriors on big Kleenex boxes. As for its height, 800 feet would be out of proportion for the hood. I’ve lived in Chicago, LA, New York and DC and I’m here to tell you, height ain’t everything. The shadows on Forest Park would be long. The supertalls in New York are becoming an oppressive sight full of billionaires looking down at the riff raff.

    • Tom of the Missouri

      Sounds like a positive Jackson Pollack review. I don’t understand but I kind of like it. Wait till those CWE association neighborhood folks who adjusted the new building at Euclid and Lindell get a hold of though . They did not like balconies, imagine what they will do to those crooked lines.

  • tbatts666

    As Kunstler says about oppressive modern architecture, this is “entropy made visible.” We should stick to tried and true architectural forms which we know can uplift and inspire. We don’t need more experimental techno-narcissism that pays no attention to who we are or where we are going.

    • Adam

      Totally disagree. Case by case. This one is a winner.

    • Tom of the Missouri

      I bet you don’t like or understand Jackson Pollack. 😉

      Love the techno-narcissism term though. Gotta remember that one How do you explain that those same techno narcissists also bought the very staid and nearby Montclair, Parc-Frontenac and Dorchester?

      • Dominic Ricciotti

        The Montclair and Frontenac, built in the 50s reflect a very conservative NYC building style that first developed in the 30s, sometimes referred to as “Moderne.” With very little construction during WWII, it resurfaced in the building boom that followed the war and is seen ad infinitum in Manhattan post WWII skyscrapers, along Park and Fifth Avenues and extending east to Lexington, First, and Second Avenues—some very expensive neighborhoods. By the time the advanced modernist International Style (Lever House and Mies van der Rohe’s Seagram building) took over in the 50s, slender glass boxes changed the built landscape forever, but the Frontenac and the Montclair still represented the “safe,” risk-free aesthetic that lingered in the hinterlands.

        Techno-narcissistic? I don’t think so, unless we’re talking about steel frame construction that was introduced mostly in Chicago in the 1890s that revolutionized skyscraper structure, but not style, to wit: the Woolworth and Chrysler buildings to name several. If anything, the proposed StL building brings “starchitecture” to StL, along with the Kohn Pederson Fox proposal for the Kingshighway and Lindell site in the next block north. An earlier example of starchitecture—though not called so yet—is Phillip Johnson’s building on Market, now the Laclede Gas headquarters.

        Incidentally, note the correct spelling of Jackson Pollock’s name (not Pollack).

        • Tom of the Missouri

          Thanks for the proof reading on Pollock, but I was complimenting tbatts666 for the Techno-Narcissism term for his use of it for the new proposed Kingshighway bldg not the other three existing park facing ones owned by same developer. It was a new term to me and I will try to remember to use it sometime. I was commenting on how the proposed owners can at the same time be Techno-Narcissist with one proposal and own those other three much less techie buildings. One cannot be a part time narcissist, can he? Isn’t it fun to even be debating modern architecture in St. Louis? I thought we were forever condemned to that neo-Bavarian 3/4 red brick on bottom and 1/4 brown top stucco with fake cornice look. I am not sure neo-Bavarian is a real term, but I think you know what I am talking about – all the Drury Hotels, many of the new apt. complexes, the insanely and poorly scaled ugly building on the North- West corner of Brentwood and Forsyth in Clayton, etc.

          • Dominic Ricciotti

            I guess I didn’t get the nuances of your post. But I agree that there’s far too much of what you call neo-Bavarian. Just about every other apt/mixed use proposal in the CWE, the Grove, etc. in one way or another plays it safe with that approach. The exception is the recently announced bldg by Trivers Associates on the wedge lot at Manchester and Chouteau in The Grove. But this too is a “safe” design from a 60 year old International Style model, like the Johnson Laclede Gas bldg on Market St.

          • Tom of the Missouri

            ¯_(ツ)_/¯¯ Sadly, I think progress is slow in the Show Me state. But things certainly seem to be changing and looking up, Just curious, what are examples of some buildings you like and would like to see in St. Louis, where and why? Is it Mies, Johnson, Post Modern, Gehry, what exactly? What style category does the proposal at Kingshiway fit into? I think I saw that proposal for the Grove, too, the one in he middle of the Y of Chouteau and Manchester., I was shocked. I hope they build it. I think it is great that even local architects like Trivers are starting to think out of the box a bit.

          • Dominic Ricciotti

            “Just curious, what are examples of some buildings you like and would like to see in St. Louis, where and why? Is it Mies, Johnson, Post Modern, Gehry, what exactly?”

            That’s a big question. First, the where. Of all the activity in the central corridor, Grand Center needs some new construction, in addition to its fine rehabs. Starchetecture like that of Gehry, Santiago Calatrava, Renzo Piano, would of course be welcome. And then there’re figures like Tadao Ando and Fumihiko Maki who already have buildings in StL; the latter did WU’s Steinberg Hall in 1960 when he was just starting out (I was an art student there then), and more recently the WU Kemper art museum. And Ando did the Pulitzer art museum in Grand Center. All the recent apartment building in the corridor draws on some aspect of Postmodernism going back to the traditional materials of brick, masonry etc., not the steel and concrete of glass boxes, so we have an abundance of that style, but as you say it’s gratifying to see architects in StL doing interesting things outside the glass box. The Kingshighway proposal is also postmodern in its flashy unorthodox form. Interestingly, that design can be linked to the new African Art museum on the Washington mall.

    • tpekren

      With Adam and Tom on this one. For me at the end of the day I like the variation this will bring to CWE. Still trying to decide if I like it or not but just the idea that developer is looking to do something different instead of glass curtain rectangle high rise that seems to be the norm at any height
      ..
      As far as the techno-narcissism, If I understand your comment correctly I can see where a design will fail if the architect is more concerned about his imagine then delivering a structure that can deliver in terms of design, delivering a style and functionality, etc. I’m expecting more refinement like most renderings and proposals to put forth the first time

  • opendorz

    Fantastic to see a new building with real pizzazz and enough height to become a new landmark here. Still waiting for one like this in the 50+ stories range to really set the bar higher.

  • Eddie in NorCal

    Stunningly beautiful building that will become an architectural landmark for St. Louis. Hard to complain about tax abatement (only 8% of project cost, btw) when this site has been a parking lot since 1970. Only 15 feet shorter than Studio Gang’s Folsom Bay Tower in SF, so it’s really quite a tall residential building for St. Louis market, don’t understand caterwauling about not reaching NYC or CHI levels of 900+ feet.

    • STLrainbow

      I’ll complain about the abatement. If a city kid enrolls in pre-school the same year this opens she will be in high school by time the luxury project pays meaningful property taxes to SLPS and she’ll have graduated by time full freight is paid.

      The incentive package should be re-worked so SLPS and other pressing needs are addressed off the bat. KC’s new ordinance capping abatement at 75% could be a model, even if that might require a few more years of 50% at the back end or other give and take.

      • Eddie in NorCal

        I’ll grant that TIF’s and similar abatements have been handed out quite generously in StL, and far too often for retail projects that merely relocate low wage jobs from one neighborhood to another.

        In this case, at 8% of the project’s $130M budget, the tax abatement totals $10.4M over 15 years, fairly front-end loaded. In the first 10 years, the 95% abatement works out to approx $825K per year.

        Of the 300 units, 90% are studio or 1BD/2BD apartments. So the SLPS aren’t likely to be burdened with many additional students residing at One Hundred. If 200 of these residents work in the City at an average of $90K, the earnings tax will generate close to $200K in additional revenue for the City.

        Or you could keep a surface parking lot on a prime corner for another 40 years.

        • STLrainbow

          I understand that sentiment; these folks might not use SLPS as much as others so abate away! But in the end this attitude is the antithesis of the whole notion of public schools and I feel it is especially troubling when a project that proposes to charge the highest rents in town gets off the hook for paying its share of the common good in the form of educating our city’s children,

          Surely there is a way to structure things so that a luxury, $120M project in the hottest area in the region immediately benefits the public schools through increased property tax revenues or PILOTs.

    • tbatts666

      Actually it’s unoriginal modernistic bull which pays no attention to how it interacts with the streetscape or the architectural styles that surround it.

      • Chicagoan

        There’s only one rendering, but the design does appear to interact with the streetscape rather well, I think.

        • tbatts666

          Compared to the office park tower, yes. It might be better than a bad suburban design. In facts it It looks like it has ground floor retail, and fits nicely up against the sidewalk.

          We don’t need to invent a whole new cosmology of building. The tried and true architectural styles work, are easy to maintain. Obvious winners.

          Many experimental design towers by celebrity architects have unpredictable structural failures. These structural failure can end up really hurting the community.

          http://weburbanist.com/2014/02/24/fallen-starchitects-7-failures-of-famous-architects/

          • Guest

            Kindly point out the structurally challenging features in this tower. I don’t see any, as your link provides examples that clearly illustrate this.

      • Adam

        Can’t roll my eyes enough.

      • Eddie in NorCal

        Modernistic, yes. But “unoriginal”? I have to disagree. I believe it does complement many of the beautiful mid century modern buildings found all around the CWE, notably on Lindell Blvd. The setback from Kingshighway appears consistent with neighboring structures.

        I think its plant-like design is a brilliant tribute to Forest Park, the tropical vegetation in the Jewel Box and the region’s new recognition as the leading area for plant science in the U.S. Combining organic forms with a modernistic building is a challenge but I think Studio Gang has hit this one out of the park. There’s a reason they are rated “Firm of the Year” in architectural circles and I think StL has captured the best design they’ve ever put out.

  • John

    Beautiful, gorgeous rendering. I look forward to seeing the final product. However, I wish the financing could be as innovative as the design. The tax abatement, welfare handouts continue, but what is the long-term cost to the public? “You paid for it.”

  • Tim

    Absolutely stunning building. More please!

  • PD

    A rooftop deck would sure offer a great view in that location. This is certainly exciting and I think it will happen considering the park east tower was/is a success.

  • thomas h benton

    Does this mean that the surface parking lot for movies at the Chase is going away?! St. Louis is going to he**! Just kidding. This is awesome news.

    • Riggle

      Nope. This is west pine and kingshighway

      • Alex Ihnen

        And nothing new to report there. This piece from 2014 is as much as we know: https://nextstl.com/2014/06/koplar-hires-kpf/

        • stldoc

          Really love this proposed building. Just stunning. I’m curious, with the Koplar/Koman project next door also potentially being a bold design gauging by the KPF architect, I wonder if the projects will enhance each other or not. The more the better and I absolutely welcome the density and forward thinking designs, just kind of wish two potentially landmark buildings didn’t have to be basically touching each other if they both get built.

          The parking lot attached to Kindred Hospital at Euclid and Lindell seems a prime spot waiting for a signature high rise. Dream with me here, but the Koman/Koplar group buys the parking lot from Kindred (assuming Kindred owns it), and have Kindred Hospital parking needs temporarily use Koman/Koplar’s Kingshighway parking lot or the public library parking garage across the street. Then Koplar/Koman build extra parking for any Kindred hospital needs in whatever project they build on the Lindell and Euclid lot. It is such a prominent and large surface parking lot begging to become something wonderful. My thought process is fanciful, but a guy can dream right?

  • RyleyinSTL

    Design is great. Hopefully it’s built.

  • Guest

    Wow…I’m impressed…Studio Gang…one of the best, and yes indeed, a stunning design it is. I do wish it could have been taller, but I’m not going to complain because of the exquisite design. If actually built and not a pie-in-the-sky offering, it will most definitely be a catalyst in returning the CWE to it’s former status with all the wonderful urban amenities offered that can’t be matched anywhere else in the entire St. Louis area. It’s about damned time someone with the ability to do so has waken up in offering a project that would return St. Louis to a city of architectural distinction for the first time in many decades. It would only benefit points east to Midtown and downtown for continued development with similar projects, demand making some projects larger.
    THIS is the kind of architecture and neighborhood true urban lovers understand and desire, and would be the choice of residency (among more to follow) of such in high rise living, not to mention incentive for corporate America to take St. Louis seriously and switch the past process of moving TO rather than FROM.

    • Guest

      Lol…sorry…my last line should have been “…and switch the past process to moving TO rather than FROM”.

  • Michael C.

    Nice….. just like New York. St. Louis is getting some STYLE!! woohoooo

    • RJ

      Well not quite New York but it is a stunning architectural design and so desperately needed in St. Louis. If this were in New York the building would be over 1,000 feet tall which is my only criticism. I wish the building was at least 500 feet tall, so it would be the tallest residential building in Missouri. Perhaps, this will be the catalyst for more high-rise development around the periphery of Forest Park which would be the St. Louis version of Central Park in NY or Lakeshore Drive in Chicago

      • Benjamin Aronov

        The worst part about highway 40 is that it means highrises can only overlook the park on Kingshighway and Skinker.

        • STLEnginerd

          Actually I think the best vista of forest park would be at debaliviere of you could get a building built of this height. You’d be able to see the history museum, the art museum the grand basin and the world fair pavilion.

          Seriously check out a birds eye view from 20 stories or so on Google earth. It’s ridiculous

      • opendorz

        Totally agree. Someone here needs to break through the 500 foot barrier that I think makes us seem not quite big league architecturally if not also psychologically.

  • imran

    Wish this was in midtown or downtown but happy to see something this unique planned for the City.

    • tpekren

      Have to disagree, I think a couple of signature designs, buildings placed on the remaining Kingshighway surface lots facing Forest Park is the best choice you could make for the region. Downtown with views of Arch Grounds would be next…
      ..
      I just see Midtown as a good solid location for mid rise infill to compliment downtown and CWE/Forest Park. Can dream and imagine a day that St. Louis region is big enough, has the population to support Manhattan density along the central corridor but dotting a tower here and there just doesn’t seem like an ideal game plan IMO

  • Chris

    Sure… this isnt happening. It will end up being 12 stores and “mixed use”. Its way to much psf for st louis.

    • DB

      It’s the same price was the sold out Orion building a new blocks over.

  • Charles Raymond

    You took this image from stltoday.com

    • pat

      Charles–Not only did Alex steals most of the pictures he uses, he usually steals he quotes from other publications.

  • Wabash

    Looks great. Reminiscent of Taipei 101.

  • Charles Raymond

    You took this image from stltoday.com

  • Scott

    This is a statement. 36 will be seen across forest park. Suburbanites visiting the zoo, or the glow, etc, will see this. This could be a notable turning point in the psychology of Saint Louis residents. Hopefully this drives more development, and even more importantly, optimism.

    • Ashley

      So true. There are few things as frustrating as the “crab mentality” of people living outside the City in this region. The comments on the Post-Dispatch article are nauseating and act like the City is a wasteland… But I guess the frustration is my own fault for reading comments in Post-Dispatch articles.

      • Justin

        Totally agree. I want to vomit after reading the comments on the post dispatch website and yet I can’t stop reading them. I must be a masochist . I just hope the comments section isn’t representative of how the region feels as a whole

        • Riggle

          It is.

        • Tom of the Missouri

          Who reads the Post anymore? What a worthless excuse for a newspaper. They must get graduates from the Forest Park Community College school of journalism. I once in a while check out some stories on line and it is extremely rare they get the basics correct, like he who, what, when, where and why of a story. Instead they of course keep relentlessly pushing the false narrative that something unjust happened in Ferguson when a thug who robbed a convenience store and then assaulted a police officer while drugged got shot and killed by said police officer. What do they have now, maybe 100 subscribers left. Even Bill McClellan got the good sense to leave.

          • Tom of the Missouri

            Just for kicks I just checked out the post comments on this story. It said there were zero comments. They must have erased them out of embarrassment. Nuts! I needed a good laugh.

          • rgbose

            I see 50. Many are positive.

          • Tom of the Missouri

            See it where? By “post” I meant Post Dispatch, which was the subject of the conversation. Since the number I saw was zero maybe I had to be signed in or something or they have me blocked, which is cool with me. We were not talking about NextStl comments, where the conversation is reasonably intelligent.

          • rgbose

            Yes, on the Post Dispatch article. I don’t have to sign in or anything to see them. Says there are 56 now.

            http://www.stltoday.com/business/local/story-apartment-tower-planned-for-central-west-end-site-on/article_cb1645e4-5651-5467-bb5f-659dd2e2c509.html

          • Tom of the Missouri

            Thanks for the link . This time it worked. I see the 56. I shall enjoy the schadenfreude of the modern design haters. I think you miss the point a bit though. Some of us I think, especially us former Globe Democrat readers, just enjoy bashing the very thin Post Dispatch. Maybe it was all the pain and cost we endured before Craigslist or something. I don’t know, but it is fun. Lighten up and enjoy the fun. My apologies if you work there.

          • rgbose

            No, I don’t work there. Just trying to help.

          • Adam

            Where was rgbose being heavy?

      • mc

        why waste your time reading the comments on the PD?

  • Michael B

    When I opened the link, I thought to myself, “no way this is in St. Louis.” Refreshing, cool, and tall! A welcome addition to one of St. Louis’ many skylines.

  • Goat314

    I’m not all that impressed with the super modern designs, but welcome the diversity.

  • johnny1421

    Looks amazing. I wanted 40 so I’ll settle with 36 😉

  • Guest

    Looks great! I hope there is more to come.

  • ParallelParker

    Shoo, baby!