The Gills to Rehab Another Mixed Use Building in the Grove (4230-34 Manchester)

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Earlier this week we reported on a rehab of two adjacent buildings (4236 and 4238-40 Manchester) by Forest Park Southeast Restoration, LP, better known as Restoration St. Louis (headed by Amrit and Amy Gill).

A $700,000 building permit has now been issued for the building located just east of 4236 Manchester, addressed as 4230-34 Manchester, which is also owned by Forest Park Southeast Restoration, AKA the Gills. That means that this stretch of three adjacent buildings now have a $1.5 million rehab planned. It appears that the rehab work has already begun at 4230-34 Manchester per a site inspection this week. The building permit notes that the building will remain mixed use.

Below is a Google Streetview capture of 4230-34 Manchester:

423034Manchester

This additional rehab will leave fewer buildings on Manchester unspoken for, continuing the Grove’s recent momentum. Combined with a new mixed use building in planning at 4321 Manchester and an even larger mixed used proposal at the Commerce Bank site on Manchester at Sarah, the Grove should have a happy new year indeed.

If we hear of reported commercial tenants or any other details of the development, we’ll report it here.

Click here for a map of the area.

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  • John R

    Looks like just down a few storefronts down at 4216 Manchester exterior work has begun on what looks like will be a retail/residential project. Not sure if we’ll recognize this boarded up strip by the end of the year if everything moves forward.

  • Mike F

    Shame about the poorly-reconstructed parapet cap. Still, at least they put back as much of the original terra cotta as they could manage. Nice cornice, and this is one of my favorite brick tones/types. Sort of a peachy/mottled/reddish/umber colorway. And I look forward to another store-front reno. (No MDF, though please; that stuff is shite). Oh, and no metal over wood, unless you want to basically reconstruct the whole thing in five years.

    A note to homeowners and property owners about cladding your wooden brick mold and other wood trim in aluminum or steel: You’ve basically just condemned every cubic centimeter of your wood trim to becoming a rotten mess. I don’t care how well you or you “contractor”* caulked, sealed, weep-holed the work, moisture will enter your precious, clean-lined metal cladding and begin to rot the wood underneath immediately (no, I DO mean that literally).

    *Any “Contractor” who calls for this metal-cladding as a solution to peeling paint and already-rotten wood is a flim-flam man, a con artist, or just plain effin’ incompetent, pure and simple. DO NOT clad wood in metal.

  • Mike F

    Shame about the poorly-reconstructed parapet cap. Still, at least they put back as much of the original terra cotta as they could manage. Nice cornice, and this is one of my favorite brick tones/types. Sort of a peachy/mottled/reddish/umber colorway. And I look forward to another store-front reno. (No MDF, though please; that stuff is shite). Oh, and no metal over wood, unless you want to basically reconstruct the whole thing in five years.

    A note to homeowners and property owners about cladding your wooden brick mold and other wood trim in aluminum or steel: You’ve basically just condemned every cubic centimeter of your wood trim to becoming a rotten mess. I don’t care how well you or you “contractor”* caulked, sealed, weep-holed the work, moisture will enter your precious, clean-lined metal cladding and begin to rot the wood underneath immediately (no, I DO mean that literally).

    *Any “Contractor” who calls for this metal-cladding as a solution to peeling paint and already-rotten wood is a flim-flam man, a con artist, or just plain effin’ incompetent, pure and simple. DO NOT clad wood in metal.