City Foundry Signs Zara, Patagonia, Reformation, Need Supply, and Others

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Will City Foundry, the $340M project set to re-imagine a long-vacant manufacturing site in the center of St. Louis City cannibalize local retail? Will it bring unique-to-the-region storefronts? This was the central question asked as the project sought, and ultimately received significant subsidies from the city.

According to leasing documents reviewed by nextSTL, it appears that Reformation, Patagonia, Zara, Need Supply, and others have signed on to the project (more on each below). Reached for comment, City Foundry developer Lawrence Group offered, “We are not commenting on any discussions regarding City Foundry tenants at this time, other than that we are not relocating any existing retail businesses that currently operate within the City of St. Louis. We will be making an announcement of our tenant lineup in due course.”

The first phase is planned as up to 125,000sf of office space as many as 45 independent retailers across 133,000sf. The handful of retailers listed here are expected to fill small to medium sized retail spaces.

A 30,000sf single tenant retail space is the project’s largest and appears earmarked for a Fresh Market grocer, according to commercial leasing information available online. However, Fresh Market exited the St. Louis market last year, closing its Creve Coeur store. Speculation is that the tenant could be Fresh Thyme Market, which now has three St. Louis area stores, with its Kirkwood location opening late last year.

Developer Lawrence Group requested $19.4M in tax increment financing (TIF). TIF allows a developer to recoup net new tax revenue to pay for specific components of a development, such as infrastructure. The original tax abatement request of 25 years was reduced to 15 years at the request of aldermen. The first phase is a $134M transformation of the vacant building into a hub of retail and restaurants. Later phases of City Foundry are planned to include new construction residential and office.

The big concern was that the development sought to lure local businesses to the site, leaving holes elsewhere in the city and providing no net gain. Burgeoning commercial districts such as Cherokee Street and Macklind Avenue were cited as being at risk. At the time, the developer told the Board of Aldermen’s Housing Urban Development and Zoning Committee, “We’re not going to be able to get this thing financed with local retailers.” The implication being that rents would be too high to attract small local businesses. With the list of retail tenants apparently signed on, this appears to be true so far.

Though not confirmed, nextSTL suspects that an initial list of tenants could be shared as early as tomorrow at a St. Louis Realtors Urban Affairs event. An invitation to that event reads in part, “Please join St. Louis REALTORS and Steve Smith, co-founder and CEO of The Lawrence Group, as we uncover more information in the $340 million City Foundry St. Louis redevelopment…” In November of last year, Lawrence Group CEO Steve Smith told the Post-Dispatch that he hoped to announce the “lead tenant lineup” in “about six weeks”.

Reformation
Created in 2009 by Yael Aflalo, the company designs and manufactures the majority of its products in its factory located in downtown Los Angeles. Other products are produced by responsible manufacturing partners here in the U.S. or abroad using sustainable methods and materials, according to the company’s website.

Patagonia
Back in 2014, we learned that Patagonia and others were eyeing retail in re-made street level space at the Chase Park Plaza. Though receiving approval from the city’s Preservation Review Board, that plan has gone nowhere. The nearest Patagonia retail store is in Chicago. The next closest? Atlanta.

Zara
The company is #53 on Forbes “World’s Most Valuable Brands” list with a value of $10.7B and annual sales of $15.9B. Zara added 77 stores in 2015. Currently, the nearest store to St. Louis is in Chicago. Zara opened its first store in the coastal town of A Coruña in the northwest of Spain in 1975. The company now has more than 2,100 stores in 88 countries.

Need Supply
Founded in Richmond, Virginia in 1996, the company initially focused on selling vintage Levi’s, later expanding its inventory to include a variety of men’s and women’s clothing and accessories. Need Supply launched its online presence in 2008 and opened stores in Shibuya and Kumamoto, Japan in late 2015. Reportedly, storefronts in New York and Los Angeles are in the works as well.

When retail behemoth IKEA opened west of Vandeventer Avenue across from the City Foundry site, many expected it to set off a retail boom in the area. Now open a year and a half, the St. Louis IKEA is reportedly hitting its expected $100M in annual sales. The City Foundry site itself was once explored for demolition and replacement with a strip mall development called Midtown Station. With retail leases apparently gaining traction, the city may be seeing its first significant new retail hub in years.

*Patagonia has reached out to nextSTL and offered the following statement, “Patagonia does not have plans to open a retail store at the City Foundry development in St. Louis.”

*Zara has also reached out to nextSTL with the following statement, “Please kindly be advised that we are not planning to open Zara in St. Louis.”

We will continue to update this story as more is known.

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  • kent evans

    TIF is not very well understood. It is not welfare for developers. The developer has to demonstrate need through a variety of “tests”. Once those are passed the developer borrows the money needed to build the project, a fraction of which may be applicable to the TIF. If the developer fudges the numbers to obtain the TIF, or has projected incorrectly, the TIF does not pay back. It is in the interest of the developer to be right about the projections or the developer loses money. This may not always be the case because TIF notes can be sold as bonds that can be sold to private investors.The issue with that is the cost to comply with the SEC requirements and prepare them for individual sale is so costly that the value is diluted. In the majority of cases the developer holds TIF, so the projections must be accurate.

    So it takes a dream, solid economic forecasts, and a lot of courage to believe in something that can still unravel because the payback timelines are so long, up to 23 years.

  • Brian Ireland

    STL is again making the mistake of investing a lot of time, energy and money into a big ticket proposal that, even if realized, will not address the issues which most need addressing in this city: neighborhood stabilization, beautification, crime, poverty, education and the nurturing of small businesses. @LarryRice4Mayor

    • Adam

      Retail attracts residents and patrons, which stabilizes neighborhoods/reduces crime. This development will also significantly beautify that stretch of FPA. The food hall is supposed to focus on local fare, and we don’t know that some of the retail space won’t be devoted to small businesses, so there’s 4 out of 6. Yeah, it probably won’t reduce poverty much (though it will create jobs) but it will generate tax revenue for the schools. I’d say this project actually addresses many of your concerns. What would be you preferred development?

      • Brian Ireland

        If this is destined to be a profitable project–and it very well may be–then a bold entrepreneur should launch it. That’s the way things used to be done prior to TIFs being doled out like candy. This endless issuance of corporate welfare is hampering more vital issues from being addressed. It’s another example of resources being poured into the Central Corridor as low-income residents in places like Walnut Park and Carondelet suffer. @LarryRice4Mayor

        • Adam

          Maybe that’s how it used to be done prior to the city’s 70+ year decline, but clearly it hasn’t been working, This is why TIF exists. Now you can argue that they’re overused and that they’re not being equitably distributed and I’ll agree with you, but this project is a valid application of them. This is a large industrial site in the heart of the city that is unlikely to be redeveloped otherwise due to the extensive remediation required. And when completed it will still generate substantial tax revenue for the city even with the TIF.

          As for Larry Rice, he can’t even manage his own shelter—much less a city—regardless of his intentions (which, I believe, are less pure that you do). His run for mayor seems more than a little retaliatory given his recent interactions with the city. He’s had countless opportunities to collaborate with more reputable homeless services in the city, yet he’s satisfied with simply stuffing homeless people into his sardine can of a shelter downtown—violating all kinds of safety codes—and offering little else to get them permanently off the street. He’s more concerned with preaching and looking like a martyr than he is with actually helping the homeless. IMHO.

          • Brian Ireland

            Can’t manage his own shelter? You mean the one he has “managed” for 45 years? That dishonest rhetoric began gaining traction once the area around him became a “cool” place to live. You have heard of gentrification, haven’t you? Reputable homeless services? You mean the ones controlled by City Hall–and dependent on government money? By the way, which of those are open door, 24/7/365 facilities that provide services to men, women and children?
            You stating as fact that NLEC does nothing to get the homeless off the street illustrates either your ignorance or dishonesty. As a matter of fact, I co-host a TV show on KNLC, which employs men and women who were formerly homeless. My cameramen and producer were all products of NLEC, but that doesn’t fit your false narrative. As opposed to regurgitating the propaganda of City Hall and downtown developers, you may want to do your homework and find these things out yourself. Perhaps you can start Thursday by joining Rev. Rice at MLK and Hodiamont. He’ll be passing out clothes and feeding the public. To you, that’s him being concerned with “looking like a martyr.” To those of us with a heart, it’s sharing and caring for people whose worries are far more significant than a Midtown retail project.

          • Adam

            So some of them are employed by Rice’s televangelist network. Is that it? Any other examples? And, yes, I mean government regulated (as if that’s a bad thing) non-profits like St. Patrick Center. You know, places where the homeless aren’t stabbing each other right outside the front door. Or where several hundred people won’t die in a fire due to overcrowding WAY beyond fire safety regulations. And god forbid downtown become a “cool” place to live—or just “a place to live” as most other cities call it. Wouldn’t want a city that’s actually populated.

            Other than being a place to congregate, I’d like to know what services NLEC actually offers 24/7/365. What does Mr. Rice do for them during the day once they’ve been turned out onto the streets? Handing out clothes and sandwiches is nice, but it doesn’t get them clean or find them jobs or the long term care that some need. It just keeps them coming back to his shelter. Now, if Larry were housing them at night and then collaborating with other services to find them homes, jobs, etc. that would be another thing. But—and correct me if I’m wrong—Larry doesn’t collaborate with other services.

            Sorry, but it seems a very naive, self-congratulatory type of “sharing and caring” with no plan for helping people long term (unless of course Larry plans to employ all homeless people at his TV station.)

          • Jaypow

            Larry Rice is a slimeball and that Drug Supermarket he calls a shelter needs to close ASAP.

        • Tim E

          I would come back and state that it is absolutely corporate welfare and why would you need it? Its jobs in a city that has 1% income tax, simply put. Why does that matter, because St Louis has an ever increasing roll of city owner properties, non tax generating properties, which I believe exceeds 7,000 parcels…
          …’
          The idea you can fund everything you want with decreasing property tax rolls and no jobs is not happening. Finding ways even if it is corporate welfare for rehabs to happen, new building construction to happen, jobs to happen in the city is the best and probably the only avenue the city has in the near term and especially for an old industrial site as the Foundry. In this case, believe all three are accomplished in first phase.
          …. .
          ..

        • Nick

          Since entrepreneurs are more concerned with profit over the beautification/development of a neighborhood, TIFs can help spur building projects that might not happen otherwise. People like to call it “welfare for millionaires” but they often contribute quite a bit to develop neighborhoods that otherwise might not have much development going on.

  • Imran

    I might be the only one worrying that this is just the latest in the tradition of high rent retail clusters (a.k.a. malls) artificially propped on tax incentives only to come crashing down in 10 years. That’s okay though, at least we will have an over-branded abandoned streetscape as a consolation prize.
    Debbie Downer 🙂

    • Tim E

      I certainly can see your points and like most retail developments the chances favor it crashing instead of exceeding over an extended period. However, I think were this project will succeed and where Union Station mall succeeded is the less glamorous aspects not being discussed. For Union Station mall it meant getting an established hotel that probably saved the shed. Retail is long gone from Union Station but it has an expanded hotel presence, the originally lobby was restored and even now the shed is getting much TLC.
      I think what Foundry will succeed at in the first phase is 125,000 square feet of office/commercial space as the rehab of 30,000 sq ft grocery store that will work for SLU/Grand and just as important support a use for the trestle. Which might be enough to kick start a second phase residential tower and Cortex East. Retail might flame out in 10 years but you will have some solid successes for an industrial property that might be vacant for another decade or so.

  • TimJim

    If Patagonia and Zara say they have no plans to locate here, why are they still in the headline? Do you not believe them?

  • Albert Davenport

    This all sounds great, but if they do this and not address crime then it’s all for nothing. Remember, in St. Louis, if they build it, crime will come!

    • Adam

      such a novel and helpful comment.

      • Albert Davenport

        Are you 12? Sarcasm gets you no where. I guess that’s why you will always be a victim.

        • Adam

          Oh, have I been a victim previously?

        • Adam

          Pearls of wisdom like “if they build it, crime will come” will get us super far, though.

          • CrimeBuilder

            It’s so funny. You gotta laugh. It’s such a 4th grade remark but there is some truth to it. Therein lies the rub.

    • Justin

      Building a more vibrant city with more people could help the crime issue because there would be more witnesses nearby.

      Any evidence that suggests that new development is consistently a target for crime in St. Louis? I would be shocked if there was

    • Nate Merrick

      The best and fastest way to stop a bullet is with a job.

  • STLrainbow

    The IKEA cafeteria provides a pretty sweet view of the progress on this project.

  • Seth

    I might have missed it, but do we know the timeline for this?

    • stlnative

      I’m assuming remediation will be done fairly soon, actual construction and building repairs should follow that closely. Maybe mid summer/early fall of this year. I’d say plan on this phase 1 to be open early Spring 2019.

  • Riggle

    Are you going to be able to get there from here? Grand metrolink is on the otherside of the highway and if you take the Grand bus its illegal to cross the street at Forest Park ave…

    • Chris

      I believe a Metrolink stop is being added at Cortex between the CWE station and the Grand station. Other than that, I think the longer-term plan is to add a skywalk from Foundry, over Hwy 40, and over to the Armory, which would put you pretty close to the Grand station.

      • Michael B

        There will also be a greenway connecting the new Boyle Metrolink stop and this new project. I believe it makes use of the trestle so crossing Vandeventer is easy.

      • Nick

        Grand Metrolink will be your best bet…the new Cortex station will be a little further away.

  • Tim E

    So if I got it correct the area is about to see approximately 350,000 square feet of office space give or take between rehab/new. Starting with Foundry at 125,000 in first phase, building permit for Wexford’s 180,000 square feet issued as well as Armory goring forward that adds even more.
    ,..
    Now if BPV II would break ground and Koman hopefully secures tenant for Cupples X you have some serious space within the city that is competitive. This is long overdue for the region.

  • Chris Stritzel

    Apple Store or Microsoft Store? Either one would do great business in this area because of the College aged residents who live in this region of the City

    • Riggle

      And everyone in the City who is currently going to the galleria

  • guest

    I’ve heard from a reliable source that there will be no new announcements at the St. Louis Realtors Urban Affairs event.

  • mc

    This will not cannibalize local retail at all. No way whatsoever. CWE is booming and growing fast and more tenants coming in. This will only spur growth. The City is doing well!

  • Pokemon Joe

    The answer is yes, it will cannibalize local retail. I’ve been told by 2 of my tenants they’re moving out at the end of the lease for this development and we’re in the CWE. Much like Ballpark Pillage turned Washington Ave into the street of vacant restaurants (theirs 5 between Tucker and 14th alone). This will shift retail from other areas. As much as we’re paying attention are we really paying attention!? Oh but hey, a fu*king Zara.

    • Will

      Did you see the comment from the developer. They are committed to not relocating any business located in the city.

      • Adam

        I don’t think that’s what Joe means, but whatever. The city is never going to grow if potential residents can only find services in a handful of neighborhoods. Besides, shopping in the CWE is minimal so I’m not sure what Joe is afraid will be cannibalized.

        • Pokemon Joe

          Will – Oh the developer is committed to not relocating any businesses already located in the City…we’re good then, if he say’s so… These guys are all about money and occupancy no matter where it comes from.

          Adam – The City is never going to grow unless it has jobs and a strong small business ecosystem also new housing stock wouldn’t hurt (also a close 4th is laying off 2,000 employees from City Hall). Hey don’t get me wrong this is a huge development. I’d rather see our vacant properties re-utilized than flood plain Walmarts being built. So yes, an eye sore littered with Ratfag or Suzy Q being freshened up is good.

          But plain and simple this is another subsidized project that will shift business around and it will.

          • Adam

            Okay, but who’s going to buy a new house in a neighborhood with no amenities? We can’t all live in the CWE. We need a combination of more housing + more jobs + making more of the the city attractive to potential transplants. Despite our slow metro growth, the city could draw from within the metro. And several of our large employers (e.g. Wash U) have trouble attracting and retaining talent as it is. That’s not a jobs issue but a perceived quality of life issue. I suspect that this development is going to benefit the entire CWE-to-Midtown corridor in the long run.

          • STLrainbow

            I think the most at-risk for taking a hit is downtown, per usual. CWE/Midtown area has enough population and jobs growth to add more retail. I wouldn’t doubt some places in CWE relocate here, but others will mostly fill that in. But this further cements west of Grand as the hot place in town, and will make it harder for downtown to capture the action; and any office relocation(s) would be especially worrisome.

          • Nick

            From the retail side, this certainly doesn’t poach from anything downtown. In general, I think the existence of Clayton is more of a detriment to downtown than CWE/midtown.

          • STLrainbow

            From a retail side, I agree there really isn’t anything downtown to steal as the state of retail there is pitiful… the issue is downtown struggling to establish any retail cluster of its own and capturing its share of new openings as more nationals come into rust belt cores again. (Compare with Detroit, e.g. where there’s a retail renaissance in the heart of the CBD.) Back a decade ago downtown was sort of the in-thing and if that were still the case we’d see some solid retail openings; but post-recession, downtown has taken a back seat to the “Greater CWE” area and it needs to figure things out…. the competition of the Foundry project will make it all that more of a challenge at least in the next few years.

          • Nick

            I think the issue for StL is that Clayton has now become the central business district. The absence of a weekday lunch crowd will forever make it difficult for downtown StL to bring back a strong retail presence. Until we can sustain two business districts, downtown won’t improve much. That’s why I think retail growth in the CWE/midtown region won’t affect downtown too much.

          • Riggle

            I think you need to go downtown for Lunch some weekday, many more people work in downtown st louis than in Clayton, and plenty of people eating lunch

          • Nick

            I’ve been downtown plenty of times at the lunch hour…there ain’t much going on. To your point, in absolute terms sure, there’s more people in downtown StL…but that population is spread out over an area about 8x the size of downtown Clayton. Judging by price per square foot of office space, Clayton is by far the hotter commercial market…and retail follows from there.

          • SnakePlissken

            Agreed. Other than Sugarfire, Porano, Hiro, Bridge and Range their isn’t much else thats appetizing. Blondies, Flannery’s and anything else McGowens isn’t good. Also, Jack Patricks, and the redneck Hockey lounge is equally is bad. Sauce on the Side is good but it gives me the squirts, so thats out.

            Downtown needs about 10K owner occupants. No more uninvolved transient renters.

          • Riggle

            Except for the thoudands of office workers eating lunch, nonce

          • Eric

            What about a town square-style retail center in the Downtown West neighborhood? An east-west cluster of retail along Olive could spur development west (so that you can push infill from Downtown to Midtown). It would be close enough for Downtown visitors/office workers to walk and is the most accessible area for all forms of transportation (wider streets than DT to support vehicular traffic – and streets are two-way, recent/in-flight improvements to Jefferson and Tucker improve connectivity from Interstates, near proposed north-south rail, multiple rail stops, central point for all major bus routes, accessible by visitors who take Amtrak/Greyhound, etc.). It would also be a destination that could drive pedestrian activity (desperately needed)…let’s not forget the jobs and sales tax revenue that the City would retain

            I would target retailers that appeal to wider customer base/broader demographic. I could see a TJ Maxx/Marshall’s, small-style Target, Cost Plus, Petsmart, Chipotle, urgent care center, yoga studio…and a Trader Joe’s 🙂

            https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/96692f2c8cd3ae50e0fb9e57aa5b241911bac3308f76a5f2bd1c91de32cac71c.jpg

          • STLrainbow

            I disagree that Clayton “has now become the central business district.” Sure, it has a healthier commercial office market and a better trajectory compared to the downtown CBD, but it has far fewer jobs and activity. Downtown has to firm up its office employment even as the area sees more residential growth if it is to truly thrive (which includes adding retail), but it won’t relinquish its role as the region’s primary CBD anytime soon.

          • Nick

            In terms of total number of workers downtown vs. Clayton, sure, there are probably more downtown (I can’t find any readily-available stats on this). But like you said, Clayton is a much healthier market right now, and because of this it is perceived to be the premium commercial district in this region. That’s what I mean by “primary.”

            Regardless, if offices downtown didn’t have to compete with Clayton for tenants, downtown as a whole would be much significantly stronger today.

          • STLrainbow

            Clayton reports 33,000 people work in the city. According to Downtown Saint Louis, Inc. (if my memory serves me right), the core CBD has about 60,000 workers and the greater downtown area, which expands out to include big employers like the Wells-Fargo, Ameren and Nestle-Purina campuses, has about 90,000.

            I guess I look at the Clayton CBD as swankier, but definitely a secondary one. But you’re right, the competition has taken a toll on downtown and neither one really is able to create the type of high-density, highly walkable environment with true vibrancy on the streets. On that note, I see a bit of our challenge is getting more companies to see not just downtown as an option, but Clayton as well… in a way, its this vast office sprawl beyond 170 that is keeping the region from reaching its potential. I’d love to see a lot more people in both the Clayton and downtown cbds.

          • Riggle

            Primary doesn’t mean what you think it means. Maybe you mean premier? Downtown has three times the office workers of Clayton… thats what “primary” means

          • Adam

            If we can create a contiguous urban environment from Clayton to DT, though, I think it will ultimately benefit DT. One of DT’s biggest detractors, I think, is that it is so disconnected from its surroundings.

          • Andy

            If only someone was willing to invest ~$250 million in the large void between union station and the Wells Fargo campus that could provide 428 permanent jobs, 400 construction jobs. As a city resident, I’d be willing to increase the sales tax by 0.5 tax to fund such a venture… #MLS2STL

          • Adam

            I’m not up to date on the latest finance plan for the stadium, and I don’t know where you’re getting the 428 permanent jobs number, but let’s not oversell it (we’ve got plenty of aldermen and investors trying to do that already). With the stadium, we’re not talking 365 active days per year. How many games per year? Twenty-something? Plus a few events. And what kind of jobs? Mostly minimum wage? I’m not necessarily opposed to the soccer stadium but I intend to delve into the financials before I decide whether or not to vote yes. In any case it’s not going to activate that part of town on its own. It’s going to require significant investment in residential and retail as well. We’ve been through this too many times. When was the last time a stadium spurred significant development in St. Louis?

          • Nick

            “When was the last time a stadium spurred significant development in St. Louis?”

            Ballpark Village

          • Adam

            It’s been 10+ years and we’re still waiting for it. And most of what’s supposed to get built is being developed by the Cardinals, so I’m not even sure it’s fair to credit the stadium.

          • Nick

            You mean we’re still waiting for phase II? Phase I is most successful development story in the city over the past decade. Also, the Cardinals developed it because they own the land. The space then filled up with restaurants not associated with the team. Don’t know how that ‘wouldn’t count’ as development.

          • Adam

            I thought we said significant development. I don’t really count a 1-block by 1-block mini theme park as significant. I’m talking about residential, office, and useful retail.

          • Nick

            For downtown St. Louis, BPV is about as significant as it gets.

          • Adam

            Lots of studies have shown that stadiums are not effective vehicles for revitalization. That’s not to say we shouldn’t build any stadiums, but that we should stop talking about them as game changers, and stop subsidizing them as if they were. Again, just look at St. Louis. Of all the stadiums we’ve built, Busch III is the first to have any related development. And it’s not organic–it’s driven by DeWitt’s desire to maximize his team’s profit potential. BPV may end up being significant if the significant part of it ever gets built. But, like I said, we’ve been waiting over a decade and all we have so far is a glorified sports bar.

          • Adam

            Let’s not forget the amount of subsidy the Cardinals have received for all this as well. Where’s the line between subsidized development and stadium-driven development?

          • SnakePlissken

            Ah a subsidized stadium spurred a subsidized ballpark pillage. It’s often overblown that BPkillage killed other restaurants BUT one thing is certain most restauranteurs don’t go near Downtown because of BPshittage.

            If anyone needs me I’ll be filing my earnings tax return. Crossing my fingers the money goes towards street cleaners that can pick up all the bullet casings around my apartment.

          • Eric

            I think someone can do it for less than $100m with no public incentives (if contractors, existing property owners, and City will work with us) – just have to create demand

          • Adam

            But at least the hotness is creeping eastward.

          • Patrick Goodson

            That has always been part of the plan. Locust Business District was created to clean it up from Grand to Jefferson and now it does all the way downtown and is doing pretty well. Washington Avenue lacks retails and restaurants. Anything that keeps people spending their money in the city is good to me.

          • SnakePlissken

            The Locust Business District is a shit show and horrifically managed. To say it’s doing a great job is completely false. The crime rate within it’s foot print is staggering. The board is in total disarray and the alderman haven’t shown up or participated in a meeting in a loooong time. Ask any building owner or business owner paying dues to The LBD. But for some god forsaken reason this town loves them a CID.

          • Adam

            Question: how is Straubs doing? Before Whole Foods opened, I kept hearing how WF was going to put them out of business. Is that happening? (Frankly I’m not that impressed with the new WF.)

          • PD

            From a friend that manages a Straubs(not the cwe one)…. They are doing just fine. Apparently people see the WF as a hassle is what hes hearing. I actually agree with him.

          • Adam

            I agree with that. The CWE Straubs is a more pleasant experience. IMO they screwed up the WF space in the Orion. It’s too cramped, doesn’t flow well, really doesn’t offer much in terms of prepared foods, and the entrance is just awkward.

          • Nick

            Straubs seems to have a decent crowd on the weekends…but the new whole foods is definitely busier the Straubs

      • Adam

        Or maybe that is what he means. In any case I think this development is great and will finally start to connect the CWE to Midtown.

        • Patrick Goodson

          It creates a triangle between CWE, Grove, and Midtown.

    • Justin Striebel

      As much as cannibalization sucks, even if there is some, the idea of having a “shopping district” is appealing to me. That would bet the silver lining outlook I’d take to that kind of development. But we’ll see how things go.

      • Will M

        i find it unlikely this development will canabalize local retail, office, or restaurants. Im not sure how many people realize just how many people leave the city to shop and eat. The benefit of this development is to capture those people and their activity from leaving the city (most would probably head over to brentwood and the galleria). This development isnt competing with the grove or euclid, those shops attract a pretty unique crowd. The few shops that might move will be replaced (i would assume quickly due to how valuable the area is).

        Just a reminder is about a block north of this development are 9,000-12,000 students and faculty that regularly leave the campus, neighborhood, and city to do the shopping they want and even going out to get lunch. Developments like this are meant to capture the potential in the area that niche developments just cant.

        At worst, this development will be blamed for the end of shops and restaurants that were either on their way ot already or had been doing the same thing for so long they forgot what a competitive area felt like (im thinking of how harrys blamed bpv for their closure)

        • Riggle

          The ammount of retail leakage in the City is staggering, friends dont let friends shop in Brenthood

  • Riggle

    Union station 2.0?

  • STLrainbow

    If I’m reading the site plan right, the grocer is slated for the Byco Building that fronts Forest Park Avenue… iirc plans were to split that two-floor 60,000 sq. ft. building into one floor of office and one floor of retail so that would seem to match up as well.

    • tony

      Just looked it up again, and that looks right. From http://stlouiscnr.com/tag/lawrence-group/

      “Byco Building on the northeast corner of the site would be redeveloped to house a 30,000-square-foot grocery store on the street level and possibly 30,000-square-feet of offices on the lower level”

      • STLrainbow

        Thanks… I think that’s the best spot for it, right up to FPA and not in the back foundry.

    • Guest

      Has there always been a parking garage to the East of the Byco Building? The renderings make that look just like a parking lot.

      • STLrainbow

        Not quite sure what the precise parking plan is but I believe they are looking at some underground parking accessed via Forest Park Avenue along with some sort of plaza and additional parking on ground level (to the west of the Byco, btw.)

  • Jakeb

    This is starting to get exciting. My better half will be very pleased to see a Zara’s.

  • Presbyterian

    This is excellent.

  • Nick

    I can’t think of what retail in the city would be cannibalized by any of these types of stores that have signed on thus far.

    • Ashley

      Only thing that comes to mind is the Lululemon in the CWE would find the space attractive but I can’t imagine the CWE will suffer at the hands of this midtown development

      • Ben Harvey

        True. Was hoping Patagonia would come to the CWE but I’m perfectly fine with them right here. Big for the college crowd

  • tony

    Pleasantly surprised by the first 4. Is a grocery still expected?

    • Nick

      Maybe a Fresh Thyme. I can’t imagine it would be a Fresh Market as they closed almost all of their Midwest stores last year.

      • tony

        If it’s a Fresh Thyme I hope it is closer to this:
        http://bit.ly/2krpRUy

        And as far away from this look as possible:
        http://bit.ly/2liP2bO

        • stlnative

          It’ll probably look like neither of those. If its going in the Byco building right there at Spring and FPA then look wont change much at all. Its a historic building that they’re getting tax credits for, it’ll be as close to the original as possible.

          • STLrainbow

            Right, This is the “Byco Building: btw for those not familiar
            http://dynamic.stlouis-mo.gov/images/imagedb/Structures/3500-4000/3700%20forest%20park002.jpg
            That’ll be really convenient for a lot SLU students but Forest Park Ave needs some bike/ped treatments there.

          • Steve Pan

            I would personally just take laclede all the way to Spring and head south

          • STLrainbow

            right… just meant that the current conditions crossing Forest Park Ave at Spring aren’t very good. Hopefully we’ll see some treatments to improve that. Also at Grand like Riggle mentioned above.

  • PD

    Im 100% down with the list so far!

  • Framer

    Wow. That’s an impressive start!