We Now Know What the $550M SLU/SSM Hospital Might Look Like

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slu_ssm_100

nextSTL has reported on the $550M SSM/SLU Hospital development since summer 2015. Slowly, details of the remade medical facility have been revealed and it now appears we know what the hospital is likely to look like. The massing plans previously shared mirror the new images, which include significantly more design detail.

It appears building facades will feature the varied-width glass panel design that has quickly become popular with institutional buildings, including the second phase of the St. Louis College of Pharmacy project, and the BJC @ The Commons building. The new tower, rising nine stories, is set back significantly from Grand Boulevard, where a  three-story ambulatory care center will connect with the tower via a Commons, which will serve as the main entrance to the facility. Two parking garages will front what will be a new Lasalle Street running east-west. Access to the facility will be from Grand and Lasalle.

While significantly more detail is revealed, nothing new is offered regarding the future of three prominent buildings within the project site. It is a near sure bet that the historic Desloge Tower remains, though its future use has not been determined. The existing attached hospital building will be demolished.

At the north end of the site, it’s a good bet that the Missouri Belting and Pevely buildings will be demolished. The City of St. Louis recently gave a development corporation led by Saint Louis University rights to control development across 395 acres spanning the school’s medical and Frost campuses. The move empowers the university to have the final say on development within the site, grant tax credits to projects, deny others, and bypass any demolition review. In the recent past, both the Missouri Belting and Pevely buildings have been saved from demolition by the city’s Cultural Resources Office and Preservation Board.

Additional new images:

slu_ssm_200slu_ssm-9slu_ssm-10slu_ssm-11

The hospital bed tower:

slu_ssm-5slu_ssm-7slu_ssm-6slu_ssm-8

Fronting Grand Boulevard:

slu_ssm-2slu_ssm-1

The Commons:

slu_ssm-4slu_ssm-3

Previous images:

SLU hospitalSSM_SLU feature

The information below is from our previous story posted June 20, 2016: SSM/SLU Announce $550M Medical Center Moving Forward, Share Site Plan

In a message to faculty, staff, and students today, Saint Louis University President Fred Pestello unveiled additional details, including a site plan for the SLU/SSM $550M academic medical center. The massive project was first reported on nextSTL last June. As previously reported, the project will be built immediately north of Desloge Tower and the existing hospital. The fate of Desloge Tower has still not been determined.

Pestello shared that the 316-bed, 802K sf project has completed the general scope and conceptual design stage and that specifics continued to be determined. He also stated that the project “furthers the progress of the SLU campus master planning initiative, which includes redevelopment of SLU-owned property to the north of these new SSM facilities.” The project is scheduled to be completed by late 2020.

Last year, Saint Louis University purchased the hospital from Tenet Healthcare, which has owned the facility since 1998, when it was purchased from the school. SLU then contribute the hospital to SSM in exchange for a minority membership interest. That deal became official September 1, 2016, allowing for planning on this project to proceed. Selected to design the project were The Lawrence Group in partnership with Hammel, Green and Abrahamson (HGA).

Continue reading: SSM/SLU Announce $550M Medical Center Moving Forward, Share Site Plan

The site of the future hospital was largely demolished years ago:

SLU demoltion

In 2011, the following site plan and rendering were offered SLU, arguing that the corner of Grand and Chouteau needed to be cleared for a new healthcare center:

SLU_PevelySLU_Pevely_siteplan

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  • miguel2586

    So did the blight study change the terms of the original Pevely demo permit? I thought they couldn’t demolish the corner building unless they had bldg. permits for its replacement.

    • rgbose

      That was true for a year. After that SLU would have had to go through the Preservation Board process again from the beginning.

      If I understand correctly the ordinance that grants Chapter 353 status states which buildings can be demoed at will. There are 12 including the Pevely

  • Grant

    Do we know exactly when and under what pretext/landowner the homes on the current site were cleared?

    • Alex Ihnen

      Yes. They were purchased over time by SLU and demolished for future development.

  • John

    Cold, utilitarian, dated…nice to have the investment but I am not inspired by the design.

  • Tim

    I really like it. It seems in a way they’re respecting the tower with the masonry tones and muted glass. I like that the main body is set back to not compete with the tower next door. They’re creating a hospital campus, not a hospital building.

  • Adam

    i hope i’m proven wrong but… meh.

  • tbatts666

    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/fbe1aa3d720aad95f7d82141d677191aff5672d29edff4e78b58f84d8b5b9736.jpg

    what makes deslodge so attractive is it’s clear front, and 3 portions (the arches on the feet, followed by body filled with windows, and the beautiful green head). It reflects the human form (legs, torso, head) because the builders thought humans were something worthy.

    These new buildings aren’t uplifting. They’re unoriginal modernistic boring pieces of trash.

    • Adam

      well said.

    • Charlna Stanley

      If you had to work in this building everyday you would think differently.

      • tbatts666

        I work in SLU hospital currently.

  • tbatts666

    This development plan makes no convincing reason to demolish Pevely. SLU has been acting with absolute impunity land banking that lot in an atrocious state. Demolishing it shouldn’t be allowed, especially when their best replacement is this kind of mediocre architecture.

    • jhoff1257

      Pevely and Missouri Belting are not involved in this project. The northern boundary would be a reconstructed Lasalle Street. Both Pevely and Missouri Belting are north of that. Those buildings can be demolished because of the development agreement SLU reached with the city regarding the blighting study for the surrounding area. I agree with you that Pevely at the least should be preserved but that isn’t SSM’s doing.

      • tbatts666

        Whose doing is it? As I’m aware SLU/SSM have a joint organization which they use for planning.

        • jhoff1257

          SLU/SSM are partners ONLY on the new hospital. St. Louis University will work with other developers to dictate development in the surrounding area that was recently blighted. That would include the Pevely and Belting buildings.

          • Alex Ihnen

            I’d imagine that SSM will have a seat at the table, as well as other organizations/groups perhaps, but yes, this is separate.

          • tbatts666

            I’m not sure what you are getting at. They have done a horeshit job around the health campus the past 20 so years. It’s sickening that they think owning all this tax-subsidized derelict land is acceptable. They have a personal responsibility to be stewards of the city, instead they land bank and don’t take care of their properties. A lot of the reason the area is “blighted” is because they own it and refuse to do anything acceptably useful with it.

          • jhoff1257

            This post isn’t about SLU’s blighting study or their land banking mistakes over the years. This is about SSM building a hospital and what it might look like. You originally ascertained that the Pevely building would be demolished because of this project. It’s won’t be. You then asked “who’s doing it” and I explained that Pevely’s demise is the result of SLU’s new masterplan with the City, not SSM’s hospital. SLU isn’t building or designing the hospital. SLU and SSM do not have a joint planning organization. As of right now they are simply partners on this hospital project. A hospital project that stops a full block south of Pevely. Again, as I said, I agree with you that Pevely should be preserved and SLU’s new agreement with the City probably warrants a post of it’s own, but this project here is not the reason it’s being knocked down.

  • tbatts666

    Can you imagine how despotic walking down Chouteau will be after that half mile of parking garage gets put in?

  • tbatts666

    The corner of Chouteau and Grand is totally disrespectful of the public realm. Is it a blank wall on the corner? Is the purpose of this architecture to make humans feel like helpless termites? I suppose The ground floor retail is a good thing.

    The Parking should be in the middle of the block, the hospitals should address the street better. A clear welcoming entrance should be facing people who arrive by bus or train.

    Great that they aren’t demolishing deslodge.

    The whole campus has enough inactivated vacant “green” space. (That no one uses ever) We don’t need any more wasted space.

    We should hold our tax subsidized institutions to higher standards. Saint Louis deserves better urban form.

    • rgbose

      Doesn’t look like this goes up to Chouteau.

      • tbatts666

        My bad the corner of Lasalle and Grand. Still it looks awful, that dismal blank wall seems to be overlooking that Plaza(?) between Lasalle and Chouteau. If they do demolish Pevely it will be the defining feature of that corner.

  • Andy

    Need green pointy roofs!

  • Tysalpha

    I like the setback… will give a very prominent view to Desloge. And since they’re showing beige and verdegris, I presume the building and glass colors will be chosen to complement it?