New Apartment Building Proposed for Pershing Avenue Surface Parking Lot

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on Facebook128Share on Reddit0Share on LinkedIn0Print this pageEmail this to someone

5510 Pershing_2-1

A new, 165-unit apartment building is being proposed for a large surface parking lot at 5510 Pershing Avenue in the city’s DeBaliviere Place neighborhood. The current owner of the lot is shown as Kilamanjaro IVC and the contractor is listed as Klitzing, Welsch and Associates. A “zoning-only” building permit application was received by the city yesterday to construct the new multi-family structure. The project would need to be approved by the City’s Zoning Section to move forward.

Plans for the apartment building show 279 parking spaces in a structured garage. Ground level space includes office and three one-bedroom apartments. The garage is wrapped by apartments through three levels, with an amenity level including courtyard, pool, and fitness center on the fourth level, and apartments rising to seven floors. The building will consist of 24 efficiency, 107 one-bedroom, 28 two-bedroom, and 6 three-bedroom units.

5510 Pershing_med 5510 Pershing-page-001 5510 Pershing-page-002 5510 Pershing-page-005 5510 Pershing-page-009

Below is an aerial of the site showing the location of 5510 as well as 5539 Pershing, a project we reported on in May.

Pershing development

The new multi-story apartment building at 5539 is also designed by Klitzing-Welsch Associates.  The lot at 5539 currently features tennis courts and a pool. Aerial photography suggests that several apartment buildings were demolished in the 1970s or 1980s to create both open spaces. If both projects are built, very few gaps in Pershing Avenue’s already dense streetscape would remain. The 5539 project site will reportedly be used as construction staging for 5510, before that project gets off the ground.

image{rendering of proposed building at 5539 Pershing}

Another apartment building was recently completed just to the east of these projects. That building, 245 Union, is part of the West End City apartment complex.

245 Union - West End City apartments{245 Union, completed 2014}

Click here for a map of the area.

_______________________________

A $22M building permit was issued in August 2016, with construction beginning in September (image from November). A building permit application was recorded in July 2015, and was canceled later that year.

5510-pershing

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on Facebook128Share on Reddit0Share on LinkedIn0Print this pageEmail this to someone
  • Whiskey Priest

    Are apartment buildings the next real estate bubble in St. Louis? They are going up everywhere and our region’s population remains stagnant.

    • rgbose

      I’ve been wondering that about hotels.

    • Adam

      well the demand seems to be keeping up with the supply so far. our city/suburb population is so disproportionate that we can probably fill them all with transplants from the ‘burbs without any net regional growth.

  • John R

    This one seems to be stuck… building permit was applied for last fall but yet to be issued. Anyone know more?

  • busterfire

    this is an idea that will alter the neighborhood entirely. the proposal is for a bldg/parking structure that is much too large for the block. the landlord/leasing agent lacks credibility in the properties he currently manages. the population/traffic will be too large for the single lane pershing street as there is no room for a dedicated turn lane. the meeting to oppose this proposal is weds august 5th at 1:30 in room 208 of city hall. please show up and stop this gradiose plan in it’s tracks. contact the bldg. commissioner at the board of adjustment immediately to oppose this horrific alteration to our neighborhood. ward 26 AB-523309-15 appeal #10645.

    • Alex Ihnen

      I respect your opinion, but I’ll be weighing in heavily in favor of this project (and the one across the street). I don’t believe Pershing, which appears all but abandoned any time I’ve driven or ridden it, will suddenly become gridlocked. What you might find is that the commercial spaces on Pershing may be more successful, the neighborhood more safe (with added eyes and people on the street, and there will be more good neighbors to meet. If this is built and the impact is terribly negative, I’ll write about it and change my perspective on developments like this.

      • WUgrad

        Unfortunately by then it will be too late. You must not have driven down our street lately or live in the neighborhood. Pershing is already gridlocked with the construction at DaBaliviere. You don’t think this is just foreshadowing what’s to come if another ~200 households move in via the two projects combined? I’m not against economic development, but I definitely don’t want this particular landlord / developer running the show. Anyone who actually knows this neighborhood and the landlord in question would understand and want to do anything possible to stop it.

        • Phil Poletti

          I live in the neighborhood but I must say I don’t know much about the landlord. Even with the construction during most of the day there is hardly any traffic on Pershing. In the morning there is sometimes if someone is very slow turning south onto Union. I would like to see some more commercial in the area and I feel that a little more density might help with this.

        • STLEnginerd

          Construction always confounds people a bit. Once it’s over what will traffic look like. Yes the neighbors bear a small burden in order to see investment in their neighborhood. In the end expect to see 200 new neighbors making about 2.5 trips along Pershing each day. Doesn’t sound too bad.

          Landlords are entitled to charge what the market can support. If your neighborhood gentrified to the point you have to move that’s a shame but where ever you move to will likely be just as nice as where you currently live prior to gentrification. If staying is a huge priority I recommend buying now so you can catch the upswing in values and still live where you want to live.

          Bad landlords are also a fact of life. If they are bad enough they will fail to make money and have to sell. I don’t see being a terrible landlord is justification enough to stop a project like this. If they are running a tenement, are failing to properly maintain their property that’s a different story.

          Parking during construction may be an issue but let’s not pretend no possible solution exist. There are two building being planned prior to breaking ground they could turn the tennis court lot into temporary parking while the larger garage is being constructed. Then when that building is finished parking shifts back to the new garage while the north side gets built. I’m sure there will be issues but I doubt it’s the catastrophe you make it out to be.

      • Ian Wrobel

        I currently live in the neighborhood, in fact I live 4 blocks away from the proposed developments, off of Clara and Pershing. I am in favor of developing the two empty lots. However, the 5510 Pershing proposal looks disproportionately large and I cannot see that development fitting in that smaller lot compared to the larger 5539 Pershing parking space lot. That is just my opinion.

    • rgbose

      I used to live on Union for four years and traveled that stretch every day and now a few times a week. During evening rush it’s fine even with DeB closed and more buses using Pershing. I walked it tonight around 6:45 and barely any traffic. Looks like the Liberty Mutual office closed leaving another empty storefront. Is the parking lot ever more than half full? It’s chronically underutilized.

      Can’t comment on the landlord.

      Shouldn’t an increase in expensive shiny new units suck up people interested in paying that much and take pressure off rents in other buildings nearby?

      Please build something at this or larger scale at Enright and Skinker.

  • Imran

    Any idea what the South facade will look like? After all, that is going to be clearly visible from Forest Park Parkway. Hoping it will be more interesting than a garage or a blank wall.

    • Alex Ihnen

      Here you go…it appears to have some exposed parking deck, but then apartments across the top half:

      • Imran

        Thanks! It’s not terrible. Makes sense that they would take advantage of south exposure and forest park views.

  • WUgrad

    I’m a former resident of Asprient’s, and still live in the area. This project absolutely does NOT need to go through. Asprient is extremely irresponsible with their construction and their parking as it is. The lot in question is (I believe), co-owned by several different landlords, since the gated area is shared by several buildings. Asprient residents park in non-designated areas all the time, even though they are supposed to have assigned spaces. I know because I used to have one. My biggest question is: where are all the residents who live in their buildings (Triumph and Central Park) supposed to park during this project?? There is absolutely not enough space in the few spaces behind Central Park or behind the condo association buildings. They say they want to target WU international students without cars: it absolutely won’t happen. I watched them gentrify Central Park. I was part of their historic renovations projects — renovations that were never written into our lease. I thought it was strange — illegal even — when they tried to hustle us into a different lease than the one we signed when they wanted to renovate. Instead we moved all our stuff into two bedrooms and lived with friends for a week. Ask any one of their current tenants and they will attest to the fact that they are terrible landlords: unprofessional, rude, and incompetent (not only did I wait two hours for someone to show up for our move-out inspection, but I was also asked at one point by one of their patronizing leasing agents if I sold Mary Kay… I’m a fucking grad student at Wash U). Most of their current tenants are middle class students and young professionals — mostly white, I might add. All of them have cars. They all need somewhere to park. I wish someone in power knew all of this…

    • matimal

      This guy’s comments exemplify everything you need to know about the reasons for St. Louis’s economic stagnation.

      • WUgrad

        False. I’m not against economic development. I’m against this landlord and this particular project. You wanna build another apartment complex? Awesome. But do it so it’s not 1. ugly 2. too big for the surrounding neighborhood 3. a burden to the existing neighbors and 4. without a solid plan for parking during construction. Not only that, I guarantee the rent prices for these apartments will be high and without limit because there’s no rent control in this city. Ballpark for this landlord’s (rather small) apartments on Pershing are $900-1100 right now. Neither will these people blink an eye to hike rent at every opportunity, I promise you. I know what they’re like because I’ve dealt with them. I’m also a lifelong St. Louisan. I love this city and I want good things for it. This project does not fall into that category, but is rather an unfortunate study in gentrification. I would love to see someone come in and build more affordable housing… that’s what we actually need.

        • matimal

          But that’s how investment works. We don’t get exactly what we want. Go to Nashville, Austin, Atlanta, etc. and see what gets built where to see how this works.

          • 3A5UC

            Oh fuck you dude. I hope someone throws up this kind of monstrosity in your neighborhood you shit eating prick.

          • matimal

            Wow….I really have hit the nail on the head, haven’t I. There just isn’t anything like this kind of intense hostility to development in Nashville, Atlanta, Austin, Denver, etc. This really help to explain the different economic trajectories of these metros.

        • Alex Ihnen

          I’m not sure that replacing a parking lot with honestly relatively modest rent apartments (this isn’t Clayton luxury) is gentrification, at least not as I’ve ever seen it used. Truly affordable housing is an issue in STL, and something we must preserve, but I think it would be hard to make the case that there aren’t affordable options in the city. It’s a big, complicated issue and so I don’t mean to be dismissive, but the idea that this is a terrible development for the city is a stretch in my opinion.

    • Adam

      it’ll be fine.

  • kjohnson04

    It’s always heartening to see a building replace a parking lot. Thumbs up.

  • Tim E

    So I take it that this larger project is going forward before of the two Pershing Ave infills? If so, good to see that developers and the bankers see the demand is there.

  • Thomas R Shrout Jr

    The Developer told the CWEA Planning and Development Committee that car sharing and proximity to MetroLink, the #1 Metro Bus were important factors in taking these projects on.

    • rgbose

      That’s great to hear. So why so much parking?

      • Thomas R Shrout Jr

        Developer says .68/unit based on current demand. Target market is WU international students who use the #1 and don’t own cars. I am thrilled that there is someone willing to develop under 1.5/unit.

        • rgbose

          The article says 279/165 = 1.69
          Is there a mistake somewhere?

          • Thomas R Shrout Jr

            I would say there is a mistake somewhere.

          • John R

            Is it possible that the garage would also serve other residents in nearby apartments as the surface lot does now? Also how much office space is there?

  • Thomas R Shrout Jr

    John Roach worked for Leon when the 1970s “resuscitation” was undertaken. John did the work and lived on Pershing for a time after it was completed. He also was the genius behind matching federal dollars for the construction of the first MetroLink line with out-of-use St. Louis assets: the rail deck of the Eads Bridge, the existing downtown tunnel and 14 miles of Norfolk/Southern right-of-way i.e. no local cash.

  • Presbyterian

    Great to see renderings!

  • rgbose

    The estimated cost in the permit is $29M

  • Presbyterian

    I believe the developer here is Sid Chakraverty / Asprient. They’ve been doing a lot of renovations on the block, and the address listed in city records is just a one digit typo from the family home in Creve Coeur. Most recently, they bought Hampden Hall behind the cathedral.

    http://asprient.com/
    http://www.bizjournals.com/stlouis/print-edition/2012/07/13/sid-chakraverty.html
    https://m.facebook.com/Asprient

  • Presbyterian

    In the 1980s, Fortune magazine called DeBaliviere Place “the most ambitious neighborhood resuscitation ever undertaken in America.” Leon Strauss and his Pantheon corporation bought just about the entire neighborhood, provided relocation assistance to move out existing residents, and then tackled the neighborhood renovation all at once. What had been a seedy, decaying and crime-ridden area became the neighborhood it is today. Promotional materials read “Don’t tell your parents where you live.”

    I’m not sure when the buildings on this parcel were demolished — whether by Strauss for parking or whether previous to his project. Either way, the added density will be a welcome sight. The lot is poorly used and is a great location for residential.

  • rgbose

    Why does it need a zoning change? It’s already E. Multiple Family Residential

    • Mike

      Doesn’t need a zoning change, the plans need to be reviewed for zoning compliance…building height, distance from property lines, parking requirements ect. When someone asks for a “zoning only” review, usually means they plan to get rejected and take it to the Board of Adjustment for a variance and my guess in this case its for a parking variance.

      • Mike

        and to add…the Klitzing in Klitzing, Welsch and Associates is a member of Board of Adjustment so the wheels are greased for smooth passage.