281-Unit The Heights at Manhasset Under Construction in Richmond Heights

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Manhassett Village - Richmond Heights, MO

Completed in 1939, Manhasset Village was the vision of the development firm Draper and Kramer out of Chicago. It was built on what was then the outskirts of the St. Louis region, along Highway 40 just west of Brentwood Boulevard. The site now sits near the center of population for the 2.8M person metro area.

The three-story, 353-unit Manhasset Village Apartments occupied the site for more than 65 years. The apartments first attracted young families and professionals looking for new housing just out of the region’s urbanized area. Before being demolished in 2005, the complex was home to primarily single professionals and recent college graduates.

Manhassett Village - Richmond Heights, MO

The owners had decided to replace the original apartments with something more grandiose. “too old and functionally obsolete. The rooms were too small, and kitchens were really tiny. “Then nothing happened. It took a decade for a more modest plan to emerge. Today, plans call for up-to 800 apartments and townhomes. The new development emerged after Richmond Heights sought proposals for residential development.

Draper and Kramer were reportedly the only developer to respond. A blight analysis determined that the Manhasset Village site met the blighting criteria. Richmond Heights then approved 70% tax abatement up to $4M or 10 years. The $54M Phase I received $42M in financing from the AFL-CIO Housing Investment Trust. All work will be completed by union labor.

Manhassett Village - Richmond Heights, MO

Heights of Manhasset - Richmond Heights, MO

Heights of Manhasset - Richmond Heights, MO

Phase I, named The Heights at Manhasset, is a four-story building of one and two bedroom apartments and rents ranging from $1,100-$1,900. The development is planned to be “heavily amenitized”, including a saltwater pool, dog park, fire pits, and views of the Clayton skyline and perhaps the Gateway Arch from some units. The development was designed by Humphrey & Partners Architects of Dallas, which also designed the Cortona at Forest Park, and is the architect selected for Green Street’s mixed-use project in St. Louis City’s The Grove neighborhood.

Following Phase I’s 281 units, Phase II’s Manhasset Flats is planned as a 40-unit luxury apartment development and has been targeted for 2016 completion. Additional future phases include Manhasset Heights, 23 high-end townhomes located on the west side of McCutcheon Road, adjacent to an established residential neighborhood. If initial phases find success, an additional 240 units are planned in both 2019 and 2022.

{Manhasset Village – photo by Ethan Palenchar on Flickr}

{Manhasset Village – photo by Ethan Palenchar on Flickr}

 

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  • kjohnson04

    I love the fact that it is multistory, dense development outside of the city. However, shouldn’t the design hide the parking, even if isn’t going to reduce it? That blueprint is a sea of asphalt.

    • cfunston

      The included plan was the original conceptual plan. In actuality there is far less surface parking and the parking garage is enveloped on 3 sides by the apartment structure. The one side that is exposed to McCutcheon is finished in a way that it will blend pretty well with the rest of the structure.

      • kjohnson04

        That’s a little bit better. I was thinking of the mistakes made with the Aventura on Oakland in the city. Rather than use structured parking and increase the number of building (and hide said parking), they went with the surface parking, which isn’t urban at all.

  • Tim E

    I think this really gives an idea of some of the changes taking place when it comes to developing residential. This particular area looks like single residential units would fit into the surrounding fabric neatly or nicely. However, the developer is purposely pursuing multi unit and a varied structure.
    .
    Which gets to the question, Is development costs even in St. Louis and or financers demanding such a high return that single residential is either happening on a very large scale by homebuilders/developer that you see in exburbs that require equity backing or by smaller developer/self construct with local funding sources as you see with some of the city infill and rehab with nothing in between?
    .
    Curious on any thoughts, my thought would have love to see this multi unit happen with the The Boulevards phase II & III and single residential on this site. Understand, different developers, bankers, etc. and probably wishful thinking. At same time, Richmond Heights can drive this somewhat but believe their hands tied in this particular project because previous use and zoning was muli unit.

  • Yes, it’s super pedestrian in appearance. But, for where it’s at, it is good infill. This is the sort of development that appeals to the future techies of Cortex and younger professionals who want to move here to take advantage of our status as “Bloomberg’s top place for career growth in your 20’s”.

    I wish everyone were so adventurous as to chose to live in amazing enclaves like Shaw, Marine Villa, Etc….but I think the reality is, in order to help St Louis continue a steady trend of population reclamation, things of this nature are somewhat necessary. A little bit of everything for all tastes! ..even if it has to be sugarless Vanilla. :p My only possible qualm would be if the city started filling up with ONLY developments of this caliber, demolishing all the maintained character in their favor…let’s hope not on that notion. But yay for *sensible growth!

  • RyleyinSTL

    They look “fine” but hardly interesting. IF I was looking for something like this it’s location on top of an Interstate would likely be a deal-breaker. Timber construction?

    • jhof1257

      They are not “on top of an interstate.” There is a parking lot, trees, and what even looks like a retention pond between the freeway and the actual buildings. No different then Aventura (except a significantly better design), or really any of the other large scale development that hugs Interstate 64 though most of metro St. Louis.

      • matimal

        In St. Louis, If a building isn’t surrounding with vast swaths of lawn, it will instantly become a den of thieves! The lawns keep us safe. They are our protectors from evil.

        • jhoff1257

          Not exactly sure what that means, but I was talking about the freeway buffer. For suburban St. Louis the setbacks here (on Edgar and McCutcheon) are actually pretty good I think.

          • RyleyinSTL

            Freeway buffer maybe on par but that doesn’t necessarily make it desirable. Freeway hugging in a timber building will mean road noise.

          • jhoff1257

            It sounds like your definition of luxury is buying a large home on a golf course.

            Luxury can mean different things for different people. I live in a great apartment building and the only “luxury” I have is an in unit washer and dryer and one level (the upper uncovered level) of a public garage reserved for my building. So for me, a salt water pool, private covered garage, dog park, gym, fire pits, etc would actually be some nice added luxuries.

            Different strokes for different folks.

          • matimal

            You’ve proved my point as if I’d planned it. Is something sarcastic if it’s true?