Sharing The Challenge: Floodplain Management Into The 21st Century (The 1994 Galloway Report)

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on Facebook0Share on Reddit0Print this pageEmail this to someone

The opening lines of the Galloway report read: The Midwest Flood of 1993 was a significant hydrometeorological event. In some areas it represented an unusual event; in most others, however, it was just another of the many that have been seen before and will be seen again. Flood flows similar to those experienced by most of the Midwest can occur at any time.

St. Louis, Missouri, and other parts of the Midwest are currently experiencing significant flooding – some will break records set in 1993. Twenty-two years after that record flood, it’s worth looking back at the report issued in 1994. It would seem that few of the recommendations proffered have been followed with any determination.

While it’s clear that human intervention has exacerbated flooding, it’s unclear that we have the will to do better. From the report: The Review Committee supports a floodplain management strategy of, sequentially, avoiding inappropriate use of the floodplain, minimizing vulnerability to damage through both structural and nonstructural means, and mitigating flood damages when they do occur.By controlling runoff, managing ecosystems for all their benefits, planning the use of the land and identifying those areas at risk; many hazards can be avoided.

Sharing The Challenge: Floodplain Management Into The 21st Century (The Galloway Report) by nextSTL.com

Screen Shot 2015-12-30 at 10.05.14 AM

Screen Shot 2015-12-30 at 10.04.52 AM

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on Facebook0Share on Reddit0Print this pageEmail this to someone
  • Tom Michaels

    Would more reservoirs on tributaries help the situation? Water is going to be the most precious resource shortly. Why not dam up more tributaries and create more reservoirs to help manage flow. Unfortunately, people and businesses will not vacant flood plans anytime soon unless the government refuses assistance to anyone in a flood plan. We all know that won’t happen.

  • Andy

    I’d rather move my house to the mountains than read that entire 272 page report. Thanks for the summary.

    Our city got very lucky that this flood occurred during a time when many people are on vacation/school break. Had this occurred during a normal week, the traffic situation might actually have people considering expanding light rail.

    • rgbose

      Or more importantly considering moving closer.

  • moe

    Too many politics are at play when it comes to the flood plains. Businesses want to build on them, people don’t want them classified as such because of insurance rates. But what part of FLOOD plain is hard to understand? Low lying land will flood. Has been for eons, and will continue for eons. The “sharing the challenge” is appropriate….because we are all in this together…what we do in St. Louis will affect other areas both up and down the rivers. And what they do will affect St. Louis. We have to work together and we have to respect nature.