Historic Soulard’s Worst Building Appears Set for a New Life

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on Facebook0Share on Reddit0Print this pageEmail this to someone

1925 S. 10th Street, Soulard - St. Louis, MO

1925 South 10th Street in St. Louis’ historic Soulard neighborhood has been neglected, it’s been abandoned, it’s partially collapsed, it’s been condemned and barricaded. Now it appears that an unlikely renovation will restore the existing 1885 structure, and more. The property and adjacent parcels recently sold for $28,500 according to city records.

This week, the city’s Preservation Review Board will consider a proposal to renovate the remaining four-family structure, and construct additions to each side elevation. The Cultural Resources Office will recommend Preservation Board approval. The redevelopment plan is being proposed by Renovations Unlimited, which specializes in historic renovations in Shaw, Benton Park, and Soulard.

1925 S. 10th Street, Soulard - St. Louis, MO

1925 S. 10th Street, Soulard - St. Louis, MO

The renovation project would result in a two-family building when completed. Units would split the historic building and each occupy a new two-story addition. The existing building is roughly 2,000 sf, additions would be 1,080 sf to to the south, and 864 sf to the north. The two completed homes will be approximately 2,000 sf apiece.

Assuming work can begin for a fall storm does anything further significant damage, the renovation will highlight once again that virtually any building is savable. This building benefited from being in Soulard, a place where such an investment as is proposed, can make financial sense.

1925 S. 10th Street, Soulard - St. Louis, MO

1925 S. 10th Street, Soulard - St. Louis, MO

1925 S. 10th Street, Soulard - St. Louis, MO

1925 S. 10th Street, Soulard - St. Louis, MO

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on Facebook0Share on Reddit0Print this pageEmail this to someone
  • Matt Ashby

    The news is good and the new owner should be thanked. The backstory on what Rothchild real estate structured and planned with the property is horrific. A case study in the very worst in real estate, or for that matter, human behavior. The city should have laws that would have paved the way for eminent domain so that the previous owner rec’d nothing in purchase price….a reward for despicable business practices.

    • T-Leb

      I believe Red Brick/Rothchild is the reason people run from city living and don’t look back.

    • MMS

      Actually, Rothschild / Red Brick proposed almost the exact same plan to Cultural Resources / Preservation board when they bought the building back around 2008 and it was denied. They were told that the only thing that could be done was to restore the existing building, and that the city would not allow any more units on the site. They paid over $100,000 for the property in order to save it, but with the downturn in the economy and the condition of the property, 2 units was not financiall feasable. The city literally tied their hands for years while denying every proposal presented. The paid over $100,000 to SELL the building, and immediately these plans were approved.
      Before crucifying a group that has saved more historic properties that any other single group in St. Louis, check your facts. You’re just wrong and have no idea what you are talking about.

    • MMS

      Actually, Rothschild / Red Brick proposed almost the exact same plan to Cultural Resources / Preservation board when they bought the building back around 2008 and it was denied. They were told that the only thing that could be done was to restore the existing building, and that the city would not allow any more units on the site. They paid over $100,000 for the property in order to save it, but with the downturn in the economy and the condition of the property, 2 units was not financiall feasable. The city literally tied their hands for years while denying every proposal presented. The paid over $100,000 to SELL the building, and immediately these plans were approved.
      Before crucifying a group that has saved more historic properties that any other single group in St. Louis, check your facts. You’re just wrong and have no idea what you are talking about.

      • Matt Ashby

        The headline and facts speak for themselves. Neighbors endured the very real public nuisance of the property since the purchase by Rothchild in 2004-05. We are very thankful that an owner with financial resources and knowledge are ready to offer the homes for sale at $400K and up. Again, we could have stronger regulations on public nuisance properties that decrease the resolution time to less than a decade. I invite any interested to reconstruct the history of 1017 Geyer — another case study in the very worse of real estate management.

  • omomma

    Landmarks, the world’s most ineffective “preservation” group, does deserve whatever praise it can get. This is a good save. Maybe Landmarks could do something for/about Old North St. Louis before it completely disappears into the maw of Paul McKee’s ugly suburb tract houses.

    • Oh, did I miss something? Has McKee publicly announced some suburban-style construction?

      At this point, all I’ve heard of was a Dollar Tree and a four-bed “hospital”. At least if he announced a plan, I’d have something tangible to point my disdain toward, rather than the intangible specter of a plan that’s been floated/funded/supported for the last 5+ years.

      • omomma

        There are already some houses up; I’m just assuming they were funded through whatever he’s invented for people who want suburban blonde brick and plastic siding to replace St. Louis’s signature 19th century brick construction.

        [Kind of like the idea of a 4-bed hospital…lots to think about there]

  • Presbyterian

    This is great news. I am wondering why they’re choosing to build the southernmost unit set back from Allen. Still, this will be a huge improvement.

    • davidblarsen

      I do agree, I would have prefered to have the southernmost building face Allen w/ any potential ‘green’ space to the rear, if needed at all for that new building. Anyways, a huge win for the neighborhood…I live on the opposite side of that block and have dreaded the day I walk by and it is lying in complete ruin. Glad to hear the great news…lets keep it rolling!

    • omomma

      Parking no doubt. This IS Landmarks remember.

  • matimal

    All the shows on the home TV channels involve rehabbing in some way. This offers St. Louis real opportunities to get a piece of a new social trend that Phoenix, Orlando, or Denver never could.

    • Alex Ihnen

      Instead, we had the faux urbanex show. I guess you just need a name like “Extreme, Crazy, Nuts Renovations!” “Brick People” or “Dangerous Rehabs”. Projects like this present an incredible story. We lose a lot in St. Louis, but we probably save more buildings in this condition than any place.

      • Michael C.

        “Brick People” sounds fun. Alright, Alex, let’s make this show happen. Where’s HGTV when you need them.

      • matimal

        Those sound good. Find out who makes programing decisions at HGTV and float those names past them for a rehab show made in St. Louis. You never know. I think there’s an audience.

  • tbatts666

    I love Soulard! best neighborhood in STL!

    Let’s keep these row houses! They are so resilient and adaptable!

  • Michael C.

    This is great news! Rehab! Rehab! Rehab!

  • NatterLiz

    It looks like Rehab Girls sold it to Reservations Unlimited. It’s listed as ‘coming soon’ on their website. http://www.renovationsunlimitedllc.com/soulard.html

    • Alex Ihnen

      Looks like you’re right. The change has been made in the story. Thanks.

      • NatterLiz

        Happy to help! it’s good news to share. 🙂