UIC Offers Infill on Gibson in The Grove

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Avant-Grove by UIC - St. Louis, MO

Developer UIC, best known for their Botanical Grove project including wine bar Olio, City Garden Montessori School, single family infill and new construction in McRee Town, has several sites available in The Grove. The following was recently posted on the company’s Facebook page:

A few months ago, we posted a survey on livegreenstl.com asking for feedback on what kind of house to build on a few lots that we are developing in The Grove. When asked about housing features, the response was to design a larger house than we have previously done, with a lot of customizable options including green features, luxury kitchens, master suites, and backyards/ leisure zones. DONE. However, we added tall, dark, and designer, too. These three models play nice with their old turn-of-the-century friends, but bring modern to new heights within the St. Louis City housing stock.

You can see more at livegreenstl.com. UIC recently won approval for its first multi-unit new construction project. That project will contain 20 apartments with ground floor retail.

Avant-Grove by UIC - St. Louis, MOAvant-Grove by UIC - St. Louis, MO

Avant-Grove by UIC - St. Louis, MOAvant-Grove by UIC - St. Louis, MO

Avant-Grove by UIC - St. Louis, MOAvant-Grove by UIC - St. Louis, MO

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  • Mike F

    Thank the maker for developers like UIC.

    Again, they’ve got the proportions down, and those facade windows! So sick of seeing sphincter-sized vinyl windows stuck onto the face and sides of apt. and res. buildings in the City. (Especially if they go onto historic structures, and even worse when the idiots shrink the opening with–ta-da!–vinyl siding; tools). I am, as always, curious as to the composition and placement of exterior finishing materials, as that can go a long way towards making or breaking a design. Perhaps the silvery material with the horizontal lines is corrugated galv-steel? I like that. Reminds me of the Garcia house on Miami, off of S. Kings’way. If the brown first-floor finish is an exotic hardwood from some place like Brazil or the Philipines, or Vietnam, or redwood (sequoia sempervirens) from CA, I’ll pass. Forests around the planet are in enough stress without the legal and illegal logging. Illegal logging is estimated to comprise at least 75% of Brazilian production. Cement-fiber board, please.

  • Presbyterian

    Love it! Keep it coming, UIC!