Citywalk on Euclid Inches Forward, Ups Retail Space to 30,000 Square Feet, Seeks Grocery

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Citywalk - Euclid at West Pine - St. Louis, MO

The 1.65 acres of vacant land at Euclid and West Pine in the city's Central West End neighborhood continues to inch toward development. The latest news is rather mundane, but sheds light on some important changes. The city's planning agency has recommended approval of a zoning change to "H" Area Commercial District, from a mixed "H" and "E" Multi-Family District. Why? Developer Bruce Mills is now proposing additional commercial space, totaling more than 30,000 sq ft., up from just 9,000 sq ft in 2009. 

The well-worn rumor is that the developer was seeking a Whole Foods Market for the space. The grocery retailer has been focused on introducing smaller stores of 35,000-50,000 sq ft in more urban locations. The nearest existing store at Brentwood Square is approximately 35,000 square feet. The hold up on any announcement may be that the City Walk retail space spans two stories, a rare model for Whole Foods. That may leave an opening for a Trader Joe's, as the specialty grocery chain's stores average 8,000-12,000 sq ft. The retail space is described in planning documents as "12,000 sq ft of grocery space on level one & 18,000 sq ft of related grocery space on the lower level".

City Walk - Euclid at West Pine, St. Louis
{rendering of "Citywalk on Euclid" from 2009 proposal appears to reflect current design}

The latest City Walk proposal is for a 6-story building with 159 rental apartments, 6,100 sq ft of community space (fitness center, club house, cafe and lounge), and 393 parking spaces (up from 312 in 2009) in a garage conceled from street view. The rendering above, from the 2009 proposal shows a seventh story on the half of the project nearest Euclid, but otherwise still appears to accurately reflect the current design.

Citywalk - Euclid at West Pine - St. Louis, MO

Citywalk - Euclid at West Pine - St. Louis, MO

Citywalk - Euclid at West Pine - St. Louis, MO

Citywalk - Euclid at West Pine - St. Louis, MO

Citywalk - Euclid at West Pine - St. Louis, MO

Citywalk - Euclid at West Pine - St. Louis, MO

City Walk - Euclid at West Pine, St. Louis
{view of Citywalk site and former Doctors Building (left) – image by nextSTL forum user arch city}

City Walk was first announced in the spring of 2005 as a 30 story, 317 unit (179 apartments and 138 condos) devopment. The heady days when a development on such a large scale seemed possible are gone. The Park East Tower (27 stories) and 4545 Lindell (11 stories) were built, while City Walk (nee Renaissanse on Euclid) and a 25-30 story building on the northeast corner of Euclid and Lindell failed to get off the drawing table.

The 11-story Doctor's Building was demolished in 2008 and the resulting hole in the ground (and pond) sat until 2011, when neighborhood residents finally demanded that it be filled. The promise of financing was invoked time and time again to justify leaving the site in poor condition for three years. While nothing has reportedly been signed, project plans appear to be nearing a starting point.

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  • b

    if anything, i hope we see trader joe’s out of this. whole paycheck? meh.

  • The Count

    I can’t look at that rendering without becoming ill. Please, no more faux tudor cardboard buildings in STL.

  • dredger

    Alex, any peep out of anybody on where Bruce Mills is on financing? on how he is financing? I think he applied for a HUD loan but I think St. Louis got its allotment last year for Park Pacific, among others downtown.
    However, You have to assume that this has to be about a good of spot/location/project in the city considering that BJC about to pick a contractor for its expansion, Cortex should be moving soon on its next phase and the new apartments already going up in FPSE….

  • Daniel Layton

    Having a grocery store where a small but important chunk of the city population is actually willing to shop would be a great step in the right direction for the city. I know plenty of people who refuse to shop at Schnucks and other similar low quality grocery stores and, as a result, habitually pour money into Brentwood as they have the only Whole Foods and Trader Joe’s. Let’s hope it actually happens.

    • pat

      Schnucks is low quality? Trader Joe’s the same company as Aldis is high quality?

      • gus

        Aldi is hight quality. It’s German

      • Trader Joe’s is considered decent quality at every location. Schnucks’ quality is variable from store to store.

        Aldi North runs Trader Joe’s. Aldi South runs American Aldis, which is considered low quality. See: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aldi

    • Diamond Dallas Dave

      I agree this would great for the city and i support development but calling Schnucks “low quality” just raised the smug level in St. Louis.

      • duder

        Schnucks quality depends on the location. The Schnucks in Des Peres is high quality. The Schnucks on Lindell is mid to low quality (the produce, service and cleanliness at that location are terrible)

        • Daniel Layton

          I’m not from St. Louis originally, and I consider Schnuck’s to be rather low-quality compared to what I’m used to. Obviously it’s not low-quality in the sense of Shur-Sav. Maybe we should say medium-quality. I’ve been to three: Grand and Cherokee, Kings Hwy and Arsenal, and Manchester and Brentwood. All have an equally unpleasant atmosphere; that dirty-sterile early 1990’s grocery store feel. I don’t experience that in Trader Joe’s (and I would consider Aldi a slight step up; German quality indeed). The food is overwhelmingly unhealthy artificial corn/soy-derived stuff, and the very few natural-ish things they carry they charge a premium for. For example, tofu at Schnuck’s is $3.50 a pack. It’s 99 cents at Trader Joe’s AND Whole Foods. That’s just extortion. Their produce is expensive and crappy. I don’t mind being called a snob, but there are plenty of other people like me whose money is going to Brentwood because they choose not to eat ultra-processed industrial junk. They also take quite poor care of their employees compared to Trader Joe’s (compare http://www.glassdoor.com/Salary/Schnuck-Markets-Salaries-E2970.htm to http://www.glassdoor.com/Salary/Trader-Joe-s-Salaries-E5631.htm). Finally, Schnuck is a disgusting sounding word that should never be the name for a grocery store. It means “stupid person” in Yiddish. In conclusion, I dislike Schnuck’s on many levels.

          • T-Leb

            Being from outside St. Louis, you probably are ignorant to the fact that Schnucks started in North St. Louis. Locally based and family owned, they bought out National which was locally based and owned in 1995. Kroger abandoned St. Louis in 1986, so did A&P in the 70s. I don’t know what you value Daniel, but at least Schnucks invests in downtown St. Louis.

    • T-Leb

      Schnucks is a union grocer… Schnucks bought out National back in the day. Schnucks has a better meat/butcher than Dierbergs. If you actually understand how to grocery shop, it doesn’t matter where you go to make a high quality meal.

  • stlgasm

    Alex, did you send Mills the photos of all the COOL infill buildings you collected? Sounds like a great project, but the look is B-O-R-I-N-G.

  • T-Leb

    Looks great!

  • Jason Stokes

    I’ve been to multiple bi-level Whole Foods. Chicago has one. The most recent is Pasadena, CA. I think there are others. It isn’t the standard, however.

    • Wabash

      New York has a few bi-level Whole Foods. There’s one in the Lower East Side and another on Union Square. I believe the Tribeca Whole Foods is also 2 stories.