St. Louis is 103rd Most Dangerous Metro Area

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According to CQ Press, the St. Louis area is the 103rd most dangerous in the nation. That would make St. Louis less dangerous than New Orleans, Orlando, San Francisco, Anchorage, Houston, Philadelphia, San Antonio, Nashville, Atlanta and 93 other metropolitan areas in the U.S.

I’ve been lucky enough to visit Memphis, Las Vegas, Miami, Battle Creek-MI, South Bend-IN, Toledo and Dover, among other cities on the list, and have spent a lot of time in Indianapolis (#38). I never felt particularly unsafe in any of these, but maybe I should have. When I pass through these and others cities now, I can be thankful that it’s only a visit and that I will soon return to a safer life in St. Louis. (Top 110 Most Dangerous Metropolitan Regions below)

The 110 Most Dangerous Metropolitan Regions – CQ Press (PDF)
1 Pine Bluff, AR 152.78
2 Memphis, TN-MS-AR 119.55
3 Saginaw, MI 86.68
4 Miami-Dade County, FL M.D. 79.24
5 New Orleans, LA 78.94
6 Florence, SC 78.73
7 Las Vegas-Paradise, NV 76.35
8 Albuquerque, NM 75.15
9 Fayetteville, NC 70.03
10 Oakland-Fremont, CA M.D. 67.94
11 Columbus, GA-AL 67.92
12 Little Rock, AR 63.34
13 Jackson, TN 62.16
14 Flint, MI 61.30
15 Stockton, CA 59.13
16 Lawton, OK 57.17
17 Shreveport-Bossier City, LA 57.00
18 Orlando, FL 55.30
19 Jacksonville, FL 54.49
20 Mobile, AL 53.54
21 Birmingham-Hoover, AL 50.97
22 Sumter, SC 49.39
23 Miami (greater), FL 49.08
24 San Francisco (greater), CA 47.56
25 Macon, GA 47.45
26 Tallahassee, FL 47.40
27 Jackson, MS 46.86
28 Hot Springs, AR 46.37
29 Tucson, AZ 45.62
30 Anchorage, AK 44.49
31 Baltimore-Towson, MD 43.68
32 Charlotte-Gastonia, NC-SC 43.38
33 Yakima, WA 42.45
34 Bakersfield, CA 40.53
35 Charleston-North Charleston, SC 40.15
36 Houston, TX 40.06
37 Modesto, CA 39.06
38 Indianapolis, IN 39.01
39 Waco, TX 37.95
40 Longview, TX 37.78
41 Salisbury, MD 37.21
42 Tulsa, OK 37.06
43 Spartanburg, SC 37.01
44 Visalia-Porterville, CA 36.67
45 Philadelphia, PA M.D. 36.65
46 Battle Creek, MI 36.14
47 Laredo, TX 35.87
48 Vallejo-Fairfield, CA 35.67
49 West Palm Beach, FL M.D. 35.51
50 Amarillo, TX 34.32
51 Oklahoma City, OK 33.88
52 San Antonio, TX 33.64
53 Lima, OH 31.96
54 Lubbock, TX 31.54
55 Columbus, OH 30.66
56 Los Angeles County, CA M.D. 30.33
57 Columbia, SC 30.14
58 Lafayette, LA 29.94
59 Texarkana, TX-Texarkana, AR 29.39
60 Panama City-Lynn Haven, FL 29.05
61 Gainesville, FL 28.84
62 Winston-Salem, NC 28.76
63 Corpus Christi, TX 28.20
64 Tuscaloosa, AL 28.15
65 Wichita, KS 27.44
66 Merced, CA 27.20
67 Savannah, GA 26.78
68 Wilmington, DE-MD-NJ M.D. 26.74
69 Nashville-Davidson, TN 25.70
70 Atlanta, GA 25.68
71 Greensboro-High Point, NC 25.35
72 Tampa-St Petersburg, FL 25.22
73 Philadelphia (greater) PA-NJ-MD-DE 24.62
74 Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale, AZ 23.89
75 Dover, DE 23.66
76 Goldsboro, NC 23.27
77 Fresno, CA 22.15
78 Durham-Chapel Hill, NC 22.05
79 Santa Fe, NM 21.33
80 Beaumont-Port Arthur, TX 20.15
81 Dallas-Plano-Irving, TX M.D. 19.78
82 Auburn, AL 19.34
83 San Francisco-S. Mateo, CA M.D. 18.82
84 Vineland, NJ 18.78
85 Salinas, CA 18.47
86 Greenville, NC 18.46
87 Fort Lauderdale, FL M.D. 17.86
88 Toledo, OH 17.82
89 Redding, CA 17.79
90 Sacramento, CA 16.57
91 Rapid City, SD 16.40
92 Wichita Falls, TX 15.94
93 South Bend-Mishawaka, IN-MI 15.22
94 Dallas (greater), TX 15.21
95 Lakeland, FL 15.17
96 Washington, DC-VA-MD-WV M.D. 14.63
97 Pensacola, FL 13.71
98 Jonesboro, AR 13.54
99 Ocala, FL 13.43
100 Los Angeles (greater), CA 13.13
101 Montgomery, AL 12.08
102 Palm Bay-Melbourne, FL 11.13
103 St. Louis, MO-IL 11.10
104 Knoxville, TN 10.99
105 San Angelo, TX 10.51
106 Milwaukee, WI 10.28
107 Colorado Springs, CO 10.24
108 College Station-Bryan, TX 9.90
109 Bradenton-Sarasota, FL 9.52
110 Cape Coral-Fort Myers, FL 8.05

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  • Alex Ihnen

    Dave certainly has a point. Crime is hyperlocal. There is some crime on my street, car and home break-ins, but I’ve been lucky and avoided those for five years. My home has been as safe as any anywhere in the nation. The problem with the rankings is that they paint a wide brush. Much of the city is very safe. And beyond the city, the rankings create an imaccurate and damaging perception of crime in “St. Louis” – the entire metro area. Until demographics change, the city will always be in the top 10. Something big has to change as relative crime stats do not vary much otherwise (or with crimefighting alone).

  • CrossingMO

    That’s the point, right? The city and metro rankings are both stupid. Though, bad press is bad press. Companies move to cities, but really to metro areas, often in very, very safe suburbs. This is why adhering to status quo is so harmful, and as Stephanie said, just bewildering self-inflicted damage.

  • stephanie_chaos

    And yet another way to look at it is why would anyone care about the safety of a city? The boundaries aren’t apples to apples. It’s just stupid that St. Louis submits itself to these rankings and magnitudes of order worse that people seem to want to own them. The self-inflicted damage is bewildering.

    • I believe it’s important that the public know true crime statistics. To hide them is to besmirch the victims of each crime.

  • Perhaps, but another way to look at the data is that we’re the most dangerous city: http://www.morganquitno.com/cit07pop.htm. Why would anyone care about the safety of a metro area anyway? Even a city’s statistics can be distorted. I care about the safety where I live, work, and play. IE, hyperlocal to me.