Why it’s all about the Metros

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It may hardly be news to many of us, but the Brookings Institution has laid clear the wasteful and unsustainable imbalance our of metropolitan versus rural state funding. This quote speaks to the current issue in Missouri, but you should read the entire report.

Click here to read Miracle Mets: Our Fifty States Matter A Lot Less Than Our 100 Largest Metro Areas:

Yet here is the problem: While America is more metropolitan than ever, the nation’s policies and structures rarely match economic reality. As a nation, we remain fixed in old arrangements, established decades ago and kept in place by bureaucratic inertia and entrenched political interests. Such a misunderstanding of contemporary urban structures inevitably leads to bad public policy decisions. Take as an example the nation’s crumbling infrastructure, now finally in the public eye. We should be spending money on metropolitan infrastructure, such as new transit lines or the maintenance and upgrade of existing roads and bridges, because it gives the best return on investment, the most bang for the buck. And yet the federal government sends the overwhelming bulk of national infrastructure funds to states, not metros. Given the vagaries of state politics, state departments of transportation in turn tend to scant metro investments in favor of building brand-new roads in far-flung places. Money that could be fueling the metro economic engine ends up widening a rural highway.

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