Green Street Set to Transform 2351 Market, Signs Avatara to 30Ksf

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2351 Market by Green Street St. Louis

From Green Street St. Louis:

Green Street Real Estate Ventures signed a 12-year lease with Avatara, a local cloud hosting/web support company, for approximately 30,000 SF at 2351 Market. Avatara is the lead tenant for the office building renovation project at 2351 Market, the former Wells Fargo building located at the prominent intersection of Jefferson and Market in the City of St. Louis.

Green Street plans to incorporate sustainable features when adapting the former single tenant building into a contemporary, Class A office space. A new sculpture will welcome employees and visitors to the courtyard entry as exterior canopies highlight the panoramic view of the Arch. New outdoor seating will be added so employees and visitors can take advantage of the planned improvements. The 85,000 SF building has large floor plates conducive to flexible office layouts and abundant surface parking. Approximately 55,000 SF remains for lease.

Green Street_2351 Market

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  • John R

    It looks like Avatara has moved in! Still work on exterior alterations, though.

  • Memphis News

    Neither the “before” nor the “after” are that great honestly. Personally, though, I find the “before” at least slightly attractive in a church meets prairie style sort of way. Whereas, the “after” is a complete failure on all levels. That corner, glass box atrium looks very much like a Walgreens. And just like Walgreens, it appears to be pretty much pointless — except for advertising the name of the company. Overall, the “after” tries very hard in a 1970’s plain white box but obnoxious sort of way but falls flat on its face. Whereas, the “before” seems much less ambitious from the start but at least accomplishes something slightly attractive or at least innocuous. The “before” will certainly age better. The “after” will go from being a failed but understandable attempt at chic, retro-modern to heinously ugly about 5 minutes after it’s finished.

    • Alex Ihnen

      Reuse of bad buildings is tough. I’ll just add that right or not, the building as is couldn’t be leased. The rethought building will be full. I wouldn’t even say rental tenants should necessarily drive design, but adapting a vacant building into one that is full – introducing jobs, activity, and revenue – is the point. And on that level this seems to be on its way to being a big success.

      • Memphis News

        I think many of the shortcomings of the existing building such as its small, narrow and dark entrance — which I am sure was a negative for any prospective tenant — could have been ameliorated by a lighter and more graceful re-design more in keeping with the original design of the building rather than the full-blown style change shown above which comes off as garish and ultimately less successful than even the original, mediocre design.

  • tbatts666

    Great to see some investment here!!

    Market st is a pretty bad stroad in an area with so much potential.

  • Luftmentsch

    Given that Avatara’s ceo gained national infamy (when he was at Savvis) for allegedly spending over $200,000 in one night at a strip-club, it’s interesting to consider just how many new businesses could spring up around this place.

  • Imran

    The seventies called ………
    Whatever……
    It’s atleast better than a gas station

  • Justin Striebel

    The current version looks more like a church built in the 90s-2000s than a barn to me, but regardless it’s not a particularly modern or urban looking building. But I don’t see the new design staying fresh very long either.

    I don’t really care though. It’s an improvement for now and most importantly it brings these back on line. It would be great to see that far edge of downtown come to life (although ideally we’d get the heart of downtown bustling again first or at the same time).

    • John R

      I agree; the new design does a decent job at what I suspect is a relatively modest cost…. I don’t really want them to spend a ton of money trying to re-make the exterior and would rather them spend the $$ on making the interior a great work space. I do think workers will enjoy that outdoor space… should be an amazing view.

      I do wish Wells Fargo Advisors would do something with their campus… some kind of liner building on Jefferson would be great as well as new construction on the sw corner. I know they are adding workers and renovating space but I’m not sure how close they are to having to expand.

  • Alex Ihnen

    Item has been updated with a new rendering that does a better job of showing how the final project should look.

  • John R

    According to a New Markets Credit submission by Green Street, Avatara plans to have about 120 workers in the building. They currently are located off Skinker just north of the Loop in what I think is still STL City,

    Not sure if they got New Markets; hopefully they determined they didn’t need them to proceed so those can go to other projects in town

  • Alex Ihnen

    Very difficult for me to understand how anything could be worse than the circle window barn aesthetic. I mean, c’mon. That’s a low bar and the planned changes are a huge upgrade, even if not your style.

    • Tim E

      I can agree on the low bar to start with but really don’t think the upgrade to the entrance as rendered is really raising the bar a whole lot either. I think the rendering is really trying to down play the roof line, the mismatch windows, etc.to make the new box entrance more appealing or focal point as expected. But I think that is why it will not come out as good as hoped for
      .
      Really think they are trading the look of the barn on top entrance and going the other way and saying, we stood a big shoe box on its end so we can have really big front doors. Why not a design that opens ups the entrance some more but doesn’t go overboard with a big shoe box standing on end, gets rid of the barn and circle windows but doesn’t try to make the building more than what it is – straight up office space in a low rise building.
      .
      On different note, curious if you know what is proposed on the back side if any. It looks they are trying to create some space for the office but separate from the sidewalks in front.
      .

    • matimal

      But…if we build buildings that look like barns and we believe that rural areas have no crime, then buildings that look like rural areas will ward off crime! Right? It’s the same logic as lawns. If places with big lawns have low crime, it is because lawns prevent crime and if we place big lawns in St. Louis we will prevent crime! Right?

  • Memphis News

    Looks better as is. Why turn it into a rather unattractive, modernist style building?

    • STLEnginerd

      I tend to agree but it’s a matter of taste. If that’s what the tenant wants I am fine with it in this case. It’s not exactly a historic structure.

    • Tim E

      Actually, neither the current entrance and or the new design seem appealing to me. The current entrance is underwhelming for the corner/location and almost like a kid hiding behind some grownups kind of feel. It would probably have been much more grander entrance if built a hundred years ago or so. At the same time, trying to add a modernist style to the entrance might work if they got rid of the traditional roof line and added some floors. But agree, don’t believe the new entrance will come out very well with existing roof line.
      .
      What would work? still trying to visualize something. I see the Optimist building in the CWE as proposed by Koman a much more appealing design but also a think the building lends itself to some changes where you get a sense of openness within by bigger windows, etc.. This building, trying to picture something different