Marine Villa Corner Building to be Rehabbed (3600-02 South Jefferson)

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A Marine Villa corner building with a troubled past may soon be rehabbed by its owner. The building is located at 3600-02 S. Jefferson, just south of Concordia Publishing. The new owner, Sam Meller, has applied for a $160,000 permit for interior/exterior alterations of the building, which will become four residential units. That building permit has not yet been issued.

In January 2012, news broke that Concordia Publishing would seek to demolish 3600 S. Jefferson to provide a green space for its employees. Ultimately, the company did not prevail and the Preservation Board denied the demolition, and so Concordia never purchased the structure. Read here for the Landmarks Association write-up protesting this intended demolition. Even prior to demolition threats, the building was troubled. A botched rehab attempt by DHP Investments in 2005 left the building structurally questionable, with its roof line raised in an inappropriate and potentially unsafe manner.

Below is a Streetview capture of the building that shows some of the faulty work on the third story:

3600SJefferson

Recently, re-tiling work was completed on the building’s mansard roof, preserving this odd configuration. Perhaps any structural issues have been addressed and the building is ready for a full rehab.

Click here for a profile of owner Sam Meller published in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch in 2012.

Click here for a map of the area.

 

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  • Adam

    For reference, here is a link to the relevant Preservation Board Agenda, including photographs of the damage:

    https://www.stlouis-mo.gov/government/departments/planning/cultural-resources/documents/upload//FINAL-AGENDA-1-23-12.pdf

    While there was minimal brick loss on the north facade near the front of the building (along the sidewalk) the majority of the loss appears to have occurred on the east and south facades (not along the sidewalk).

    Whatever the motivations behind Concordia’s request for demolition, I will reiterate that I am happy to have Concordia in the city, and I am happy that this buildings is going to see new life.

  • Concordia Publishing ONLY sought to get the building spoken for or tore down because bricks were seen falling off of the building onto the sidewalk below where children were walking and playing. When the alderman spoke in favor of doing something, at that moment the only choice was to tear it down. Concordia Publishing is very happy that someone finally bought the building and has plans for it to be rehabbed. In this case a very costly endeavor. Concordia Publishing has been in St. Louis since 1869 and also has a vested interest in the neighborhood.

    • Adam

      My only objection is with the following hyperbole: “…where children were walking and playing.” Not only is it unlikely that children were walking and playing on the sidewalk at the time the bricks fell, but photographs of the fallen brick showed that the rather minimal damage was primarily confined to the rear of the building, not along the sidewalk.

      • It was witnessed and photographed

        Dr. Bruce G. Kintz
        President and CEO
        Concordia Publishing House
        3558 South Jefferson Ave.
        Saint Louis, Missouri 63118
        Phone: (314)-267-1904
        e-mail: [email protected]

        • tgeperson

          I’m glad that Concordia failed in its efforts to have the building demolished,but let’s not be too hard on Concordia. Many companies have moved out of the City over the years, but Concordia has not and has continued to have its operations in an area that for many years was pretty rough. We urbanists tend to be a bit doctrinaire at times, and we should moderate those urges where we can.

          • Our effort was not aimed at demolition but rather that action would be taken on the building. I succeeded. I am happy with the result.

          • tgeperson

            Umm…okay…my information suggests Concordia sought and was denied a demo permit, but really my larger point was that Concordia should be credited for keeping its operations in the City.

          • Yep. Tactic worked

          • Alex Ihnen

            OK, instead of starting with this, “Concordia Publishing ONLY sought to get the building spoken for or tore down because bricks were seen falling off of the building onto the sidewalk below where children were walking and playing. When the alderman spoke in favor of doing something, at that moment the only choice was to tear it down.”, perhaps it would have been more clear if you would have stated something like, “We sought a demolition permit to force action on the property and are glad that it seems to have worked.”

          • Not our first rodeo my friend. As a publisher I appreciate your editorial comments on my post.

          • Alex Ihnen

            It’s just weird how comments were a little contentious for no reason at all, apparently. Glad Concordia is still in the city, and glad the building is getting some love.

          • Yes. Words like “failed in its attempt” cause that. Agreed.

      • And I might add the entire top of the building on the sidewalk side was missing. Go look at the new brick installed last year. Also we had people picking up the brick on the sidewalk and throwing them in the back. Our windows look out onto that building.
        Dr. Bruce G. Kintz
        President and CEO
        Concordia Publishing House
        3558 South Jefferson Ave.
        Saint Louis, Missouri 63118
        Phone: (314)-267-1904
        e-mail: [email protected]

    • Alex Ihnen

      Bruce – I greatly appreciate your comments here. It’s easy to forget that crumbling buildings can be a legitimate safety concern. I think what many people on this site disagree with is the willingness of St. Louis to demolish a building that needs renovating. Yes, this was a heavy haul, but it’s a project that proves, as has been proven many, many, many times in this city, that our built environment is valuable. Demolition should truly be a last resort. If this building has been removed, nothing of a similar quality would have been built. The bar should be very, very high for demolition of our historic built environment (not to mention our tax base). I hope in the future that such challenges are met with an extended collaborative effort to market a building threatened with demolition. I hope you agree that the outcome in this case is a big victory.

      • Ask anyone at Concordia and they will tell you I am always admiring St. Louis architecture. I was born and raised here. As I said my goal was to get something done with the building. And now a good guy, Sam Mellor has it. I went to lunch with him and discussed the whole thing. He does great work.

  • Presbyterian

    That’s a great little building and essential for defining the intersedction. Intersections should have buildings on all four corners. 🙂