Groth Guide to Lafayette Square

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Lafayette Square neighborhood - STL

Lafayette Square neighborhood - STLLafayette Square is a south St. Louis neighborhood located north of I-44, south of Chouteau, east of Jefferson and west of Doleman. The 2010 Census showed population growth of 317 residents, an 18% increase for the relatively small neighborhood. From 1990 to 2000, Lafayette Square lost 2% of its population. For two decades this has been an incredibly stable neighborhood. In 2000, 68% of residents were white white, 28% black, 1% Asian, 1% Latino/Hispanic and occupied 1007 housing units, of which 88% were occupied, 65% owner, 35% rental.

Undoubtedly one of the premier neighborhoods in the nation, not just St. Louis, Lafayette Square is a destination as well as a nice, dense community. If you are taking someone on a tour of St. Louis, you’d be crazy to pass this neighborhood up. The neighborhood is St. Louis’ oldest national historic district. I will try to shut my mouth and just let the pictures do the talking. The Victorian mansions surrounding the park are what make this place famous.

Lafayette Square neighborhood - STL

Lafayette Square neighborhood - STL

Lafayette Square neighborhood - STL

Lafayette Square neighborhood - STL

Lafayette Square neighborhood - STL

Lafayette Square neighborhood - STL

Lafayette Square neighborhood - STL

Lafayette Square neighborhood - STL

Lafayette Square neighborhood - STL

Lafayette Square neighborhood - STL

Lafayette Square neighborhood - STL

Lafayette Square neighborhood - STL

Lafayette Square neighborhood - STL

Lafayette Square neighborhood - STL

Lafayette Square neighborhood - STL

Lafayette Square neighborhood - STL

Lafayette Square neighborhood - STL

Lafayette Square neighborhood - STL

But, it’s the innards of the neighborhood that really stand out to me.  The row houses and townhouses add to the charm.

Lafayette Square neighborhood - STL

Lafayette Square neighborhood - STL

Lafayette Square neighborhood - STL

Lafayette Square neighborhood - STL

Lafayette Square neighborhood - STL

Lafayette Square neighborhood - STL

Lafayette Square neighborhood - STL

Lafayette Square neighborhood - STL

Lafayette Square neighborhood - STL

Lafayette Square neighborhood - STL

Lafayette Square neighborhood - STL

Lafayette Square neighborhood - STL

Lafayette Square neighborhood - STL

Lafayette Square neighborhood - STL

Lafayette Square neighborhood - STL

Lafayette Square neighborhood - STL

Lafayette Square neighborhood - STL

Lafayette Square neighborhood - STL

Lafayette Square neighborhood - STL

Lafayette Square neighborhood - STL

Lafayette Square neighborhood - STL

Lafayette Square neighborhood - STL

Lafayette Square neighborhood - STL

Lafayette Square neighborhood - STL

Lafayette Square neighborhood - STL

Lafayette Square neighborhood - STL

Lafayette Square neighborhood - STL

Lafayette Square neighborhood - STL

Lafayette Square neighborhood - STL

Lafayette Square neighborhood - STL

Lafayette Square neighborhood - STL

Lafayette Square neighborhood - STL

Lafayette Square neighborhood - STL

Lafayette Square neighborhood - STL

It’s not all large single-family homes. Some nice apartments:

Lafayette Square neighborhood - STL

Lafayette Square neighborhood - STL

Lafayette Square neighborhood - STL

Lafayette Square neighborhood - STL

Another positive is the sensitive infill construction that has occurred in the neighborhood.  This has to be one of, if not the best examples of modern infill.  With a few exceptions, most of the neighborhood has a good flow. There are still some empty lots and spaces awaiting more infill. But, in my time living in St. Louis, the neighborhood has seen some amazing progress.
The Lafayette Walk development:

Lafayette Square neighborhood - STL

Lafayette Square neighborhood - STL

Lafayette Square neighborhood - STL

Lafayette Square neighborhood - STL

Lafayette Square neighborhood - STL

Lafayette Square neighborhood - STL

An exception:

Lafayette Square neighborhood - STL

This is almost a full service neighborhood. It’s got independent retail, coffee shops, cafes, several restaurants, Square One micro brewery, community gardens, highway access, churches, racial/lifestyle diversity, proximity to major employment areas and the central business district. There is now a pharmacy in the adjacent vicinity; the Barr branch of the library is right across Jefferson in the Gate District neighborhood. You are a short bike ride from City Garden, Busch Stadium, Scottrade Center, Soulard, McKinley Heights, Randall’s Liquor Store, Schnucks Culinaria, the Union Station Metrolink stop, etc.
Shopping, entertainment and relaxation along Park:

Lafayette Square neighborhood - STL

Lafayette Square neighborhood - STL

Lafayette Square neighborhood - STL

Lafayette Square neighborhood - STL

Lafayette Square neighborhood - STL

Lafayette Square neighborhood - STL

Rue Lafayette Cafe:

Lafayette Square neighborhood - STL

Community gardening:

Lafayette Square neighborhood - STL

Neighbors looking out for each other and not backing down to the idiots:

Lafayette Square neighborhood - STL

A former shoe factory converted to condos, and the tasty Eleven Eleven Mississippi restaurant (yellow awnings):

Lafayette Square neighborhood - STL

Lafayette Square neighborhood - STL

Oh yeah, and I almost forgot…the park. Today I saw a group of people playing old school baseball complete with bare hand defense, wooden bats and period uniforms:

Lafayette Square neighborhood - STL

Lafayette Square neighborhood - STL

There are some sites along Jefferson and Chouteau that are less than attractive including the former Praxair site, which had a tragic explosion back in 2005.

Lafayette Square neighborhood - STL

Lafayette Square neighborhood - STL

Lafayette Square neighborhood - STL

But there are many other signs of positivity that outweigh the negatives along Chouteau and Jefferson:

Lafayette Square neighborhood - STL

Lafayette Square neighborhood - STL

Lafayette Square neighborhood - STL

Lafayette Square neighborhood - STL

Lafayette Square neighborhood - STL

Eden Lofts:

Lafayette Square neighborhood - STL

Lafayette Square neighborhood - STL

There are still some opportunities for further re-use and added density:

Lafayette Square neighborhood - STL

Lafayette Square neighborhood - STL

Lafayette Square neighborhood - STL

Lafayette Square neighborhood - STL

Lafayette Square neighborhood - STL

Lafayette Square neighborhood - STL

Lafayette Square neighborhood - STL

Cheers to all the people who have invested their time, money and creativity over the years, toward making this a premier St. Louis place. Keep up the good work!

Finally, a quick history of Lafayette Square from the neighborhood website:

Lafayette Square is a reminder of Victorian St. Louis in its most flamboyant years, the last quarter of the 19th century.

Lafayette Park is the focal point of the Square, a last link to the little French settlement of 1764. It is an extension of the St. Louis Commons which was reserved for public use as pasture and farm land in the European tradition. It remains the only land within the city never under private ownership.

The 30 acre park was platted in 1836, making it not only the oldest of city parks, but also the first park west of the Mississippi River. The name commemorates the popular hero of the American Revolution who visited St. Louis in 1825. For some years the area was considered too remote for practical residential development and locally the park was known as “Grimsley’s Folley”. Colonel Thornton Grimsley, a member of the Board of Aldermen, enthusiastically supported retaining a portion of the Commons for the enjoyment of all the citizens of St. Louis. With a population of less than 16,000 and municipal development hardly past the present Fourteenth Street, the public’s pessimism is easily understandable.

The city made few improvements in Lafayette Park in the 1840’s and 1850’s, but by 1860 the population of St. Louis had increased 900% over the previous 20 years. During the prosperous post-Civil War years, Lafayette Square became one of the most fashionable neighborhoods in St. Louis and its park became the most popular recreation spot in the city.
Individuals of both local and national reputation built imposing residences here. Among them were Montgomery Blair, appointed Postmaster General by Abraham Lincoln; David Nicholson, prominent wine and grocery merchant; Louis Brandeis, later U.S. Supreme Court Justice; D.C. Jaccard, noted jeweler; Charles Nagel, Secretary of Commerce and Labor in the Taft Administration; Mrs. Firmin Desloge, widow of the mining magnate; Joseph LaBarge and Horace Bixby, famed steamboat pilots; and three St. Louis mayors – John S. Thomas, James Britton and Henry W. Kiel.

But by the 1890’s newer St. Louis neighborhoods developing to the West were enjoying increased popularity. The devastating cyclone of May, 1896 hastened the Square’s decline. Destruction to the park and surrounding residences was so extensive that many entrenched families apparently decided to join the migration.

By the 1920’s the neighborhood around Lafayette Park was a neglected, slightly disreputable part of the Near Southside. Many splendid dwellings became rooming houses and multiple units occupied mostly by transient renters.

The grandeur of Lafayette Square remained only a faded memory and some distinguished structures failed to escape the wrecking crews. Even so, amid the decay and neglect, the neighborhood never entirely relinquished its Victorian charm and unique character.

In the late 1960’s a small core of individuals with a fondness for old homes entered the scene. Eager to accept challenge, they organized the Lafayette Square Restoration Committee and encouraged others to discover the rewards of restoration in a cosmopolitan urban atmosphere.

Subsequently, Lafayette Square has enjoyed a resurgence unparalleled in St Louis during an era of mass exodus to the suburbs.

In 1972 the city acknowledged, by ordinance, Lafayette Square as its first historic district. In 1973 the U.S. Congress placed Lafayette Square on the National Register of Historic Places. A Historic Code preserves the neighborhood for future generations to see and enjoy.

*This guide was first published in March 2010

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